From the original Château de Loubens castle remains today the main 15th and 16th century building and three towers which still bear their original Renaissance design. The north facade, facing the park, is framed by two defensive round towers. The high west walls plunge into a pond, remains of the original moat. On the south side, the castle sunny terrace overlooks the surrounding countryside. An hexagonal tower embeded into the Renaissance main building brings rhythm to the facade.

The 10 acres around the castle have been redesigned using to the best the remains of its previous successive settings. The most ancient elements date from the Renaissance period. Among them, some remarkable box trees and 500 years old green oaks. A little parterre in classical French style on the north side leads to 4 squares of wild prairies framing a large alley planted with limetrees in 1825. Inside the grove, a stream, a bassin and a fountain bring animation and coolness into the woods.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.chateaudeloubens.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

patrick EMO (9 months ago)
Petit château resté dans son jus meublé avec les souvenirs de la famille très sympathique
Edwige Hericourt (11 months ago)
Ouverture uniquement pour les groupes et sur rdv. Déçue de ne même pas trouver le parc ouvert..
Margot C (2 years ago)
Nice old castle that is now privately held. Visits are possible during the yearly "journées du patrimoine" or on specific appointments.
P CH. (2 years ago)
Nous mettons 5 étoiles pour la vue extérieure malheureusement 6 euros l'entrée par une journée de patrimoine un peu cher .... dommage
Darren Chilton (3 years ago)
wonderful castle to visit on a Sunday next the church, lovely village and nice restaurant
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