Combelongue Abbey

Rimont, France

The abbey of Combelongue was founded in 1138 by Arnauld d'Austria, count of Pallars for one of his sons Antoine, who became the first abbot. It was on the way of the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela which made the abbey prosperous until the 14th century.

From 1446 the abbey began to decline. It was affected by the Black Death (1353-1355) and damaged during the Hundred Years War and the Wars of Religion. In 1568, Combelongue Abbey was devastated by Protestants from the Tarascon region. In 1789 the abbey was looted and burned. In 1791 it was secularized and later sold as national property .

Built entirely of pink brick, this Romanesque abbey is one of the few witnesses of the Mudejar influence in the region.

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Address

Combelongue 223, Rimont, France
See all sites in Rimont

Details

Founded: 1138
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

gisele Escriva (2 years ago)
Très bien entretenu site calme surprise du découvrir un moulin
Isabelle JULIEN (3 years ago)
Dans le cadre des journées du patrimoine 2018, visite très intéressante sur l'histoire de cette Abbaye.
Helios Minguez (3 years ago)
Très intéressant guide pour une bâtisse remarquable ( ah l'art romano mudéjar )!
Mylène GALY (3 years ago)
Faite le détour et soyez à l'heure par respect pour votre hôte qui vous reçoit. Un beau morceau de patrimoine !
Marco Comandante (3 years ago)
Une personne handicapée qui se reposait de la chaleur sur le parking privé de l'abbaye, le proprio s'est dépêché de la virer, son parking était vide, ça donne même pas envie d'aller visiter ...
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