Lombez Cathedral

Lombez, France

Lombez Cathedral is a brick church with an ornate pink-and-white five-tiered octagonal bell tower constructed c. 1346. A plaque to the right of the plain west entrance records the visit of the Italian poet Petrarch in 1330, arranged by the bishop, Jacques Colonna (1328–41), also of Italian extraction, who made Petrarch an honorary canon in 1335. The typical blank west façade of meridional Gothic is relieved only by a small roundel and the Flamboyantentrance in stone. The severe exterior is characteristic of the region with tall buttresses around the chevet.

Below the tower in the interior is a remarkable 12th-century baptistry, which was part of an earlier church. The lead baptismal font is made of two pieces, the lower part decorated with religious figures in medallions in the style of the 13th century, and the upper part with a frieze of secular scenes of antique design. The stopper in the base suggests it was used for total immersion which was practised until the 9th century.

Other items of note are the 17th-century walnut choir stalls, the altar in Carrara marble consecrated in 1753, and the 18th-century organ at the west end. The three panels of brilliantly colored 15th–16th-century glass in the chevet are by the followers of Arnaud de Moles, restored in the 19th century, and illustrate scenes from the Life of Christ and from the Passion. The rest of the glass is 19th-century.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 1346
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Valois Dynasty and Hundred Year's War (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

marie helene devault (9 months ago)
A splendid place in a village center that has come back to life. A real pleasure to stroll in the alleys.
Loulou Ouppy (9 months ago)
Magnificent
Jc (14 months ago)
Its good
yann seris (2 years ago)
Small for a cathedral but the treasure room is well supplied
yann seris (2 years ago)
Small for a cathedral but the treasure room is well supplied
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.