Tarbes Cathedral

Tarbes, France

Tarbes Cathedral was established during the 12th century. There remain two apses of the choir. A first extension was made in the 14th century by the addition of a Gothic nave. Its extension extended until the 18th century with the outer span. The cathedral resembles a fortress as it was built with round pebbles from the river Adour which have also been used for the construction of many houses in Tarbes. It can accommodate up to 600 people.

A large baroque canopy in marble from the 18th century houses as the main altar. 

The cathedral also includes a chapel of the Blessed Virgin in which visitors can read the testament of Louis XVI engraved on a black marble wall three meters high. Another peculiarity is that there is a treasure house and within there are ornaments, chasubles and old bishops' sticks.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

James Blauvelt (10 months ago)
magnificent
Debbie Gilbert (12 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral
pets prestations (19 months ago)
Belle cathédrale que j'ai visite hors célébration et que j'ai eu la joie et l émerveillement quand je suis allée à la messe chrismale
Aura P. (19 months ago)
Beautiful 12th century cathedral. Very impressive. Its full name is Notre-Dame de la Sede.
Aura P. (19 months ago)
Beautiful 12th century cathedral. Very impressive. Its full name is Notre-Dame de la Sede.
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