Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes

Lourdes, France

The Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes is a pilgrimage destination; sick pilgrims are reputed to be miraculously healed by Lourdes water. This ground is owned and administrated by the Roman Catholic Church, and has several functions, including devotional activities, offices, and accommodation for sick pilgrims and their helpers. The Domain includes the Grotto itself, the nearby taps which dispense the Lourdes water, and the offices of the Lourdes Medical Bureau, as well as several churches and basilicas. It comprises an area of 51 hectares, and includes 22 separate places of worship.

Beginning on 11 February 1858, a 14-year-old peasant girl named Bernadette Soubirous claimed to have experienced a series of apparitions of a girl dressed in white and with a blue belt around her waist, who eventually introduced herself as the Immaculate Conception, a name by which the Virgin Mary was known.

The first sanctuary to be built was the Crypt, which is below the Basilica of the Immaculate conception. Construction started in 1863 and was consecrated in 1866. The second sanctuary to be built was the Basilica of the Immaculate conception also known as the Upper Basilica. It rises above the one of the Rosary and the Crypt. the construction began in 1866 and was completed and open for worship in 1871.

The third sanctuary to be built was the Rosary Basilica, Our Lady of the Rosary was successfully concluded thirty years after the Apparitions 1883 to 1889 and had great restoration work and improvements were carried out in 2006. The interior of the Rosary Basilica is impressive with a mosaic of  the Immaculate conception and mosaics depicting the fifteen Mysteries of the Rosary.

The fourth and fifth sanctuaries to be built were the Basilica of Saint Pius X and the church of Saint Bernadette. The Basilica of Saint Pius X is underground and colossal, the shape resembles an overturned boat. The church of Saint Bernadette is the newest construction and holds 5,000 people and took 7 months to build in 1988 it a very modern and spacious building.

The heart of the sanctuary is the Grotto of the Massabielle. Pilgrims from all over the world come to Lourdes to pray at the spot where Mary appeared to Bernadette Soubirious. The name Massabielle Means 'old Rock'

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Founded: 1863
Category: Religious sites in France

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hanna W (8 months ago)
Lovley place. It meant so much to me. I went there for the first time with my mum in July 2019. It felt like heaven on earth. The people are lovley. It was blissful and joyful to be there. I would recommend Lourdes to anyone. It is worth it.
Hector Sauvage (Hector Sauvage) (11 months ago)
God bless Mme Bernadette Soubirous.
yee (Yeebee) (12 months ago)
A wonderful catholic shrine. This is a truly memorable pilgrimage site. It is so peaceful and spiritual. A shrine of healing and reconciliation.
conscience333 (12 months ago)
I used to go all the time but the new recteur doesn't seem to like traditionally-minded Catholics unless their presence is profitable (e.g 50th anniversary SSPX for Christ the King weekend). Otherwise, Latin Mass attendees are obliged to leave the premises if they wish to receive the Body of Christ in the traditional manner, not possible during the old Mass.
Nixon White (16 months ago)
Similar grotto we have also back home. Healing and recovery miracles happen here if you believe. No more explanation it's inner mind feelings. Better experience straight showing up there
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