Flaran Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey located in Valence-sur-Baïse. The abbey was founded in 1151, as a daughter house of Escaladieu Abbey, at the confluence of the Auloue and Baïserivers, between the towns of Condom and Auch. The abbey was founded by Burgundian monks and today represents one of the best preserved abbeys in the south-west of France.

After its foundation, Flaran Abbey experienced rapid growth. In the middle of the 13th century, the abbey, jointly with Gerald V, Count of Armagnac, founded the fortified town of Valence-sur-Baïse on a hillside on the other side of the Baïse river.

The abbey did not escape the vicissitudes of history, beginning with the Hundred Years' War, which ended with the Plantagenet county of Gascony being realigned with France. Engulfed by fire during the French Wars of Religion, the abbey was restored by subsequent abbots, but was suppressed and sold off during the French Revolution.

In 1913, the Archaeological Society of Gers intervened so that the abbey would not end up in the architectural collection of George Grey Barnard that resulted in The Cloisters museum in New York City.

The site was purchased by the department of Gers in 1972 and underwent an intense restoration project; it is now the site of numerous cultural activities. The site houses a permanent exhibition on the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela, the Way of St. James.

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Details

Founded: 1151
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andy Mercer (12 months ago)
Fantastic place to visit. Full of lovely place of medieval history
Paul Tulip (12 months ago)
Beautiful place with really interesting exhibitions of history and art. Loved it.
ntonckens (13 months ago)
Beautiful small abbey. Very nicely restored. Dates back from 1151. Beautiful private art collection. The surroundings and gardens are beautiful. Serenity surrounds the area. Well worth a visit.
James Newton (2 years ago)
Some intriguing masterpiece artwork is exposed here, but it's all a little run down and the garden isn't kept. The actual church is the most interesting piece of architecture, though it is completely bare and has no stained glass windows. For the 5€, it's worth the visit.
James Newton (2 years ago)
Some intriguing masterpiece artwork is exposed here, but it's all a little run down and the garden isn't kept. The actual church is the most interesting piece of architecture, though it is completely bare and has no stained glass windows. For the 5€, it's worth the visit.
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