Château de Thibault de Termes

Termes-d'Armagnac, France

The Château de Thibault de Termes was a medieval castle in the French town of Termes-d'Armagnac. The construction of castle dates from the end of the 13th century and start of the 14th century for Jean, Count of Armagnac. The keep is 36 m high and includes six levels. Strategically built on a hill which dominates the valleys of the Adourand the Arros, it allowed the d'Armagnac family to keep watch over the frontiers of the province of Armagnac.

Its most famous inhabitant was the founder's son, Thibault d'Armagnac, who fought alongside Joan of Arc. He gave evidence on her behalf at her trial.

The castle belonged to the Armagnac-Termes family until the French Revolution, when it was declared a national asset and sold. Various people owned it until it was bought by the commune in the 1960s. The main building having been demolished, the stone of what remained was used to build the railway line between Port Saint Marie à Riscle. The keep became overgrown until it was bought by the commune in the 1960s and, under the Association du Pays vert de d’Artagnan, restored and turned into a museum.

The tower now houses a museum of Gascon life with exhibits on regional history and culture.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mickael BUSTEAU (2 years ago)
Visite d'un lieux historiques avec la possibilité de faire la visite en costume. Et les lieux sont beaux. Une super vue en haut de la tour. La visite quand il y a beaucoup de monde doit être plus compliquée. Des explications audio dans les différentes pièces. A visiter
Topa (3 years ago)
It's nice. Really the only reason to go is the for the view or if you love old castles.
Trooper of Game (4 years ago)
Great tower, fantastic experiencies!
Chris Evans (5 years ago)
A visit to a 13th century castle and a prerecorded tour of the times at 4 various stops while going up the equivalent in height of a 12 story building you are gifted with an amazing panoramic view ... make sure you are able to climb some stairs
Greg Parker (5 years ago)
Excellent Halloween event!
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