Château de Flamarens

Flamarens, France

castrum is mentioned on the site of Château de Flamarens in 1289, and is believed to have been remodelled in the 14th century. Additional building work and alterations were made some time between 1469 and about 1475 by Jean de Cazanove for Jean de Grosolles. The northern part was built before 1536 by Georges Dauzières for Arnaud de Grossolles. Alterations were made to the windows and interior decoration in the 18th century. The castle was partially destroyed by fire in 1943.

The castle is privately owned.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Riou Amandine (8 months ago)
Une vraie vie de château... On mange bien et on dort bien. Je recommande. Accueil chaleureux
brandstatterpatrice brandstatterpatrice (9 months ago)
Superbe ouvrage. Peut être visité en Eté avec ameublement adapté. L'église mitoyenne est en rénovation.
Francois Ballenghien (9 months ago)
Lieu historique. Et visite approfondi avec le propriétaire qui réalise des travaux de rénovation sur ce monument
Alain Murat (11 months ago)
Joli petit village à visiter la visite ne dure pas plus de 30mn
Joel Bourthoumieu (12 months ago)
Beau cité beaucoup de travail encore à faire félicitations aux personnes qui font cette restauration
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