Éauze Cathedral

Eauze, France

Eauze former cathedral is a national monument. It was the ecclesiastical seat of the former Diocese of Eauze, which was merged into the Bishopric of Auch, probably in the 9th century. Eauze Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Luperculus, who is said to have been a bishop here in the 3rd century before being martyred.

Odon, Count of Fezensac, founded a Benedictine monastery on this site After 960 AD. In 1088, the monastery was united with the abbey of Cluny and become then a priory. This status remained until the French Revolution. There exact time of construction of churches prior to the current church is unknown.

The construction of the present church was ordered by Jean Marre, who had became a prior of Eauze in 1463. The church had to be built on the site of a previous church, probably with three naves, which would explain the narrow width of the nave compared to its height (21.5 m at highest). The monument underwent a major restoration between 1860 and 1878.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patrick Mendez (3 months ago)
Très beau à voir
Bernard Anthoine (4 months ago)
Cathédrale un endroit magique et des concert de clarinette
Gilles Cherance (4 months ago)
Belle extérieur
Bruno Americano (4 months ago)
Um sítio a vizitar limdo antiquado
Jacky Sueur (8 months ago)
Magnifique, à voir. Sur la place de la cathédrale, de très bon restaurants.
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