Éauze Cathedral

Eauze, France

Eauze former cathedral is a national monument. It was the ecclesiastical seat of the former Diocese of Eauze, which was merged into the Bishopric of Auch, probably in the 9th century. Eauze Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Luperculus, who is said to have been a bishop here in the 3rd century before being martyred.

Odon, Count of Fezensac, founded a Benedictine monastery on this site After 960 AD. In 1088, the monastery was united with the abbey of Cluny and become then a priory. This status remained until the French Revolution. There exact time of construction of churches prior to the current church is unknown.

The construction of the present church was ordered by Jean Marre, who had became a prior of Eauze in 1463. The church had to be built on the site of a previous church, probably with three naves, which would explain the narrow width of the nave compared to its height (21.5 m at highest). The monument underwent a major restoration between 1860 and 1878.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M Edith (2 years ago)
A magical place it is the first time that I see a church with a mixture of stone and brick it is very beautiful and worth the detour
Stephane Mottot (2 years ago)
Beautiful Gers heritage. A must see when visiting the city
Catherine Michon (3 years ago)
Quel saint! Quel édifice! De belles mosaïques ds le choeur. Entrez!
Maria Garcia (3 years ago)
Elle est absolument magnifique
Claude FRISOU SECHER (4 years ago)
Very beautiful cathedral. Superb chapels and stained glass windows. Each chapel has its description of the works on display.
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