Séviac Gallo-Roman Villa

Séviac, France

Set on a hilltop surrounded by vineyards and cypresses, the Gallo-Roman villa of Séviac was a luxurious residence, spread over almost 6500m2. It is today one of the largest Gallo-Roman villas known in the south-west of France. The villa was built in the 2nd century AD and reconstructed in the 3rd and 4th centuries. Later in the 8th and 9th centuries the place was used for a church, burials and necropolis. The villa is distinguished by its exceptional set of Roman age mosaics (over 625m2) and vast baths.

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Séviac, France
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Details

Founded: 2nd century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lucia Palmer (5 months ago)
Amazing place .so much to see.ground are open to the public your able to see the grounds up close .well worth a visit
Andy Mercer (10 months ago)
Amazing place to visit , have visited this place many a time over the past 6 yrs .,each time is a lovely experience.
Susan Pike (11 months ago)
Fabulous site. Really excellent visit.
Barthelemy “Bartholome” (3 years ago)
Nice touristic place to visit
Malcolm Stringer (3 years ago)
Superb visit, you are given a book guide ( mine in English!).
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