Séviac Gallo-Roman Villa

Séviac, France

Set on a hilltop surrounded by vineyards and cypresses, the Gallo-Roman villa of Séviac was a luxurious residence, spread over almost 6500m2. It is today one of the largest Gallo-Roman villas known in the south-west of France. The villa was built in the 2nd century AD and reconstructed in the 3rd and 4th centuries. Later in the 8th and 9th centuries the place was used for a church, burials and necropolis. The villa is distinguished by its exceptional set of Roman age mosaics (over 625m2) and vast baths.

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Séviac, France
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Details

Founded: 2nd century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Barthelemy “Bartholome” (3 years ago)
Nice touristic place to visit
Malcolm Stringer (3 years ago)
Superb visit, you are given a book guide ( mine in English!).
Julie Kulesza (3 years ago)
A fascinating visit, very tranquil, well restored and simpathetic to the environment
Jeff Richards (3 years ago)
History before your very eyes... very helpful staff, and I love the protective covers! The guiding magazine needs clarity to show you more clearly where exactly you are on the site, would be a bit difficult to show children which was which.
Simon Cooper (3 years ago)
Well laid out and signposted Roman villa with good guide in English. Can buy tickets at a discount for two other related attractions. Worth a visit if you like a bit of history, site is mostly under cover so you do not get crisped by the sun.
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