Nääs Castle

Floda, Sweden

Nääs Castle is a 17th century mansion near Gothenburg, Sweden. In the later half of the 19th century Nääs became world renowned through its Crafts College and for more than 50 years it was regarded as 'Swedens window to the world'.

According to legend, King Kristian II built a castle for hunting parties at Näs. The first historical evidence on Nääs Estate however, derives from record dated 3 October 1529. The first known owner, Joen Småswen, constructed a large manor on the promontory in Lake Savelången. At the end of the 16th century the estate was owned by the governor of west Sweden, Göran Eriksson Ulfsparre. It was subsequently owned by Ulfsparres family members and the noble families Lilliehöök, Natt och Dag, Cronsköld, Oxenstierna, Göthenstierna, von Utfall and Reenstierna.

1824 the estate was sold to Peter Wilhelm Berg, a wholesaler from Gothenburg. After his death the property was divided between his surviving children (only 3 out of his 10 children survived childhood). Bergs’ son Theodor and his daughter Nensy were allotted Nääs factories. The youngest son, Gottfrid, received the rest of the estate, including the mansion. A memorial stone to the 7 dead brothers and sisters was raised in the Castle gardens at the northern side of the mansion. In 1868 the mansion and associated land was sold to August Abrahamson, yet another wholesaler from Gothenburg. Abrahamson founded the famous Crafts College and donated the entire property to the State after his death in 1897, in order to secure continuity for the Nääs educational programme.

The main building on the cultural heritage site of Nääs estate, Nääs Castle, is now museum open to the public, daily between May-September (only guided tours) as well as for pre-booked group-appointments outside of the tourist season.

The estate exists of a number of historic buildings open to the public. In addition to a restaurant, café, art & crafts shop and west Sweden’s very own heritage foundation, byggnadsvård Nääs, a range of exciting public events are organized each year (more information and Nääs Castle and Crafts College home page). Art & Crafts courses, though in a far lesser extent, are still practiced in one of the buildings.

The old stable is now home to a horse riding school and Nääs horse association. Beside several nature and walking trails, Nääs estate also provides Bed & Breakfast as well as conference accommodations. During the summer several craft courses are held at the ’Slöjdseminariet’, the crafts college official building.

Nääs Castle and Crafts College is administered and maintained by August Abrahamsons foundation, a Swedish government administration.

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Address

Nääs allé 8, Floda, Sweden
See all sites in Floda

Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
uk.naas.se

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

klas fredman (2 years ago)
Nice suroundings for a walk or a picnic, easy to access.
igor kalcic (2 years ago)
God fod nice service... wonderful to take a walk in the woods
cairong chen (2 years ago)
0 star to the café! We had midsummer lunch buffe here and encountered the most rude waiter ever. He charged us 95kr for our 1 year old, and refused to refund after we explained the the baby has his own canned food. In the end he refunded but threatened us the baby couldn't eat a bite of their food. Will never come back. Won't recommend the café to any children family.
Lina Svensson (2 years ago)
Excellent venue with historical charm. The restaurant has gluten free and lactose free food options. Buffet, soup and main menu were of reasonable quality. Staff were lovely and helpful especially with restricted diets.
Kyle MacDonald (2 years ago)
The castle is on this little island in a lake, and it's so pretty to walk around. Didn't get to see the furniture in the castle, as it's only open for tours in summer. The stables were open and so was the restaurant. Restaurant is nothing much to write home about though. It had recently snowed, the walk around the island and the surrounds was amazing. The have a long history of arts and crafts!
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