Timotesubani Monastery

Tsaghveri, Georgia

Timotesubani is a medieval Georgian Orthodox Christian monastic complex located at the eponymous village in the Borjomi Gorge.

The complex consists of a series of structures built between the 11th and 18th centuries, of which the Church of the Dormition is the largest and artistically most exquisite edifice constructed during the 'Golden Age' of medieval Georgia under Queen Tamar (r. 1184-1213). A contemporary inscription commemorates the Georgian nobleman Shalva of Akhaltsikhe as a patron of the church.

The church is a domed cross-in-square design built of pink stone, with three apses projecting on the east. Its dome rests upon the two freely standing pillars and ledges of the altar. Later, two – the western and southern – portals were added.

The interior was extensively frescoed in no later than 1220s. The Timotesubani murals are noted for their vivacity and complexity of iconographic program. These frescoes were cleaned and studied by E. Privalova and colleagues in the 1970s and underwent emergency treatment and conservation with aid from the World Monuments Fund and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation in the 2000s.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Doris Cahill (3 years ago)
Remote ancient church tucked in the Borjomi Forest, there are tiny signs guiding you there but ask the locals as you make your way in a sturdy four wheel drive car. The charming church shop was local crafted souvenirs, honey, candles, wine and cha cha. The church interior has magnificent paintings on the ceiling through the steeple. Worth the trek on s wintery day.
Toko and Giorgi gamers TV (3 years ago)
The place shoul be visited at least once a life❤
Davit Tevzadze (4 years ago)
⛪ Timotesubani (Georgian: ტიმოთესუბანი) is a medieval Georgian Orthodox Christian monastic complex located at the eponymous village in the Borjomi Gorge, Georgia's Samtskhe-Javakheti region. The complex consists of a series of structures built between the 11th and 18th centuries, of which the Church of the Dormition is the largest and artistically most exquisite edifice constructed during the "Golden Age" of medieval Georgia under Queen Tamar (r. 1184-1213). A contemporary inscription commemorates the Georgian nobleman Shalva of Akhaltsikhe as a patron of the church. The church is a domed cross-in-square design built of pink stone, with three apses projecting on the east. Its dome rests upon the two freely standing pillars and ledges of the altar. Later, two – the western and southern – portals were added. The interior was extensively frescoed in no later than 1220s. The Timotesubani murals are noted for their vivacity and complexity of iconographic program. These frescoes were cleaned and studied by E. Privalova and colleagues in the 1970s and underwent emergency treatment and conservation with aid from the World Monuments Fund and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation in the 2000s.
Frédéric cnt (4 years ago)
Amazing site. Worth to go there. Buy the small book to the monk (7 laris). It explains the paintings
Tengo Gogotishvili (4 years ago)
Amazing site and wonderful nature around. Perfect for sightseeing and picnic
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