Khertvisi Castle

Khertvisi, Georgia

Khertvisi is one of the oldest fortresses in Georgia and was functional throughout the Georgian feudal period. It was first built in the 2nd century BC. The church was built in 985, and the present walls were built in 1354. As the legend says, Khertvisi was destroyed by Alexander the Great.

In the 10th-11th centuries it was the center of Meskheti region. During the 12th century it became a town. In the 13th century Mongols destroyed it and until the 15th century it lost its power. In the 15th century it was owned by Meskheti landlords from Jakeli family. In the 16th century the southern region of Georgia was invaded by Turks. During next 300 years they have owned Khertvisi too.

At the end of the 19th century Georgian and Russian army returned the lost territories and Khertvisi became the military base for Russian and Georgian troops. Khertvisi fortress is situated on the high rocky hill in the narrow canyon at the confluence of the Mtkvari and Paravani Rivers.

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Details

Founded: 1354
Category: Castles and fortifications in Georgia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jacqueline Senne (3 months ago)
We enjoyed this place very much, price was reasonable (5 GEL) . Nice stopover on the way to or from Vardzia
Anatoly Lifshits (3 months ago)
It nice fortress, but they started to take 5 lari for entrance. It worth visit, but it very different then Rabat fortress. If you around enter it.
Ilya Karsky (3 months ago)
Nice point to take a shot
carissa stamenkovic (3 months ago)
Looks very impressive from the outside but nothing happening on the inside.
frederic thomas (4 months ago)
Beautiful historical place, in process of rehabilitation. You can fill the strength of the place.
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