Vanis Kvabebi Cave Monastery

Aspindza, Georgia

Vanis Kvabebi is a cave monastery in Samtskhe-Javakheti region of Georgia near Aspindza town and the more famous cave city of Vardzia. The complex dates from 8th century and consists of a defensive wall built in 1204 and a maze of tunnels running on several levels in the side of the mountain.

There are also two churches in the complex. A newer stone church that is in quite good shape stands near the top of the wall, and a smaller, domed church that clings to the rock on the level of the highest tunnels.

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Details

Founded: 8th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adrian von Stechow (15 months ago)
A guy in a car charged us 5 lari to enter. The day we were there we saw absolute no one, and were treated to a mysterious complex and a kennel full of puppies!
Doris Cahill (2 years ago)
Located no more than a kilometer from Vardzia Cave site, this cave and site and monastery is smaller in scale but grand in views. There is no entrance fee to visit and its open daily with no posted hours. Note there n commercial vendors at the site, but are decent paths, parking and road up is recently renovated. Less crowds and the mountain views and scenery from the top simply breathtaking. You would not want to miss it. Keep in mind there is a free spring water to drink and good restroom in good condition, the local monks seem to allow visitors to use. There is a dress code when visiting the monastery, so you should abide by it. That is, leave your shorts and mini skirts and tank top in your car or bus. To get there a local marsh runs from Alkhaltsikhe several times a day to Vardzia for 5 GEL each way, but you need to ask them to stop and flag it on down on your return. Or you can find a local tax or guide Alkhatlsikhe will take you to this and other popular places, A private cab one way in high season runs 50 to 60 gel.
David Kurchishvili (2 years ago)
Amazing place
Nino Gambashidze (3 years ago)
Great place for a weekend trip with family and/or friends. Nice historical sights and hiking opportunity
David A (3 years ago)
Vanis Kvabebi is a cave monastery in Samtskhe-Javakheti region, near cave city of Vardzia. The complex dates from 8th century and consists of a defensive wall built in 1204 and a maze of tunnels running on several levels in the side of the mountain. There are also some churches in the complex.
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