Kumurdo Cathedral

Akhalkalaki, Georgia

Kumurdo Cathedral is situated on Javakheti Plateau, 12 km southwest from Akhalkalaki. According to the inscriptions on the walls, written with the ancient Georgian writing of Asomtavruli, the Kumurdo Cathedral was built by Ioane the Bishop during the reign of king of the Abkhazians Leon III in 964. During the Middle Ages, Kumurdo was an important cultural, educational and religious center. The cathedral was restored twice (1930; 1970–1980), but it stands without a dome.

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Details

Founded: 964 AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ლიეხიმ ეძიქილემ (14 months ago)
gorgeous place with medieval GEORGIAN cathedral but very aggressive people, which don't allow to see the church
sophio maisuradze (18 months ago)
ჭეშმარიტი ქართული ხელოვნება, ჭეშმაიტი რწმენა, ამ ორ რამეს აერთიანებს ეს ტადზარი. კუმურდოს ტადზარი ჯავახეთის ზეგანზე, სოფელ კუმურდოში მდებარეობს და მეათე საკუნის ბრწნვალე დზეგლია, ნახულობ კუმურდოს და თავში მოდის ფიქრი ბაგრატზე, სვეტიცხოველზე... გენიალურია! ამაჟად მიმდიანრეობს ტადზრის არდგენითი სამუშაოები... ყველამ უნდა ნახოთ, აუცლებლად...
David A (2 years ago)
X century Georgian Orthodox Cathedral which is under reconstruction nowadays
Ia Kakichashvili (2 years ago)
Historically rich place the monastery of Kumurdo, in the village Kumurdo. Village is populated by ethical Armenians who were sheltered in Georgia after the 1915 Genocide. It is medium size village in the center of which the Kumurdo church is situated. The church itself represents the place of historical scripts and th structure of the complex is interesting for the area it is placed. Worth of visiting in May, as it is quite hot in summer there. Be aware, that locals are not very positively attentive when see foreign visitors. They don't speak Georgian.
Арцви Навасардян (3 years ago)
Ararat peoples history
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