Falkenberg Castle was founded probably between 895-898 AD, but not mentioned before 1154. In  1294 Aldsassen monastery bought it. In 1428 the monks successfully defend the castle against the Hussite invasion. During the Thirty Years' War in 1648 Hans Christoff von Königsmarck (Swedish-German soldier) conquered the castle and left it in ruins.

After been decayed for centuries, Friedrich-Werner Graf von der Schulenburg, a German diplomat and ambassador in Moscow, bought the castle as his retirement real estate. Following images from old paintings, he rebuilt the castle from 1936 – 1939. Schulenburg was part of the Operation Valkyrie, the failed assassination of Adolf Hitler. He was executed shortly after in 1944. The Gestapo confiscated the castle in World War II and arrested prisoners from the Flossenbuerg concentration camp. After the war, the Schulenburg family assumed ownership of the property.

Since its grand opening in 2015, visitors are invited to explore the castle’s museum and spend a night in the castle hotel. The castle also features a unique restaurant and a large knight’s hall for events.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: East Francia (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Danka Michalkova (2 years ago)
Such a beautiful place with the castle, amazing church, friendly people and awesome for cyclists. It is great to be here. I hope I will be able to come back again and see even more..
Danka Michalkova (2 years ago)
Such a beautiful place with the castle, amazing church, friendly people and awesome for cyclists. It is great to be here. I hope I will be able to come back again and see even more..
ammootje (2 years ago)
We didn't visit the inside but outside was promising
ammootje (2 years ago)
We didn't visit the inside but outside was promising
Ciprian Muset (2 years ago)
Amaizing, exceding the exceptations! No gosts inside!
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