Hohenberg Castle, situated adjacent to Czech Republic border, was built in the Hohenstaufen period between 1170 and 1220 to protect the important Schirndinger Pass. Around 1300 Hohenberg came to the possession of burgraves from Nuremberg. in 1433, Hans von Kotzau defended Hohenberg against the Hussites.

The present castle was built mainly (ring wall, round towers) in the period around 1480. In the years 1499 and 1504 was reported by the construction of the outer bailey. In the years 1621 and 1622 Margrave Christian had massive, provided with seven bastions earthen walls around the castle, which were additionally fortified with palisades . However, these precautions did not help much, as in June 1632 imperial troops took the pass from Schirnding, conquered the Hohenberg and occupied it for three years. After the Thirty Years War, Hohenberg Castle lost its strategic importance. 

Since 2017, Hohenberg castle has been extensively renovated and used as a youth hostel as well as for meetings.

Architecture

The castle is surrounded by the ring wall built around 1480 on an irregular hexagonal floor plan, which is additionally attached to the corner points by the gatehouse, three round gun turrets and the square prison tower. A fourth round tower was abandoned in the 19th century. From the medieval interior is nothing left. The so-called princely house was built by Margrave Christian Ernst in 1666 as a town hall and hunting lodge. Other buildings inside the castle were demolished in the 19th century. A remnant of the earthwork from the years 1621/22 has survived.

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Details

Founded: 1170-1480
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ilona Conrad (3 years ago)
A very nice place. The castle is small but delightful in its kind. If you look out the window on one of the turrets you have a beautiful view into the distance or on the surroundings.
Ralf Matthes (3 years ago)
Nice castle, the whole landscape is very nice, not forgetting the very good restaurant just opposite. One can only recommend
Stefanie (3 years ago)
Were there last saturday. Everything locked and no access due to construction site. Nowhere was an info to find. ?
Rob (3 years ago)
Through the locked gateway, it could be seen that there was probably some reconstruction in the castle, perhaps because it was closed. On their Facebook, however, they were informed that they were open. It is a pity, perhaps in the next attempt, we and other visitors will have more luck. The stars are in the environment in which the castle stands, keeping the castle in the state it is and for parking.
Denise (3 years ago)
Wunderschöne Burg mit toller Sicht. Die Anlage ist sehr gepflegt.
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