Magaña Castle

Magaña, Spain

The castle of Magaña is considered to be one of the most important castles from the 15th century in the province of Soria. This castle is in better condition than what we are used to seeing in the area and the best way to contemplate its majestic silhouette is from the road on the way towards Fuentes de Magaña or from the highest parts of the town. You will be able to see all the plants that have reclaimed its walls contrasting with the ochre tones of the landscape where the tall keep sticks out from its hiding place in the middle of the castle’s courtyard.

It is located on a steep hill near the town and it dominates the valley of the Alhama River over which a medieval bridge crosses. On the hillside, there is a chapel with a rectangular apse which some authors believe to be pre-Romanesque.

The castle is built of stone and is organised into two walled enclosures around the 9th or 11th-century Berber keep, much older than the rest of the ensemble and belonging to a group of Berber towers that were erected all throughout the valley of the Rituerto River, such as the Masegoso, Trévago, Noviercas, Castellanos, La Pica or Aldealpozo towers. This tower still maintains the original battlement hexes and some windows framed with ashlar stonework.

The inner enclosure has very tall walls and has a quadrangular floor plan with the keep at one of its corners and cube-shaped structures on the other two. The outer one is much lower and its floor plan is quite irregular with seven cube-shaped structures scattered throughout the hill’s perimeter.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.sorianitelaimaginas.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Merche Zamora (2 years ago)
Espectacular vista en un lugar histórico, en un entorno tranquilo y mágico .
Sergio Turón (2 years ago)
Desde lejos se ve mejor que cuando te acercas.
Charlyrived51@gmail.com Rived (2 years ago)
maravilloso el paisaje que se divisa antes de entrar, y desde las murallas.
Pedro Angel Forcada Morales (2 years ago)
Espectacular Castillo.El mejor conservado de la zona.
Sergio Fernández Bueno (3 years ago)
Imponente castillo que domina al pueblo de Magaña desde una colina. Es fácilmente accesible y está en relativamente buen estado
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