Íscar Castle

Íscar, Spain

The first written mention of Íscar was in the year 939 AD in Muslim chronicles. The remaining Christians reconquered Iscar in 1086 AD. Build on the ruins of its ancient fortress, Iscar’s Castle stands majestic looking over the village. The oldest preserved parts of this fortress (probably dating back to the 13th century) are remains of the curtain wall and the inside structure of the tower. To provide a defence against possible attacks from the west side, weak point, the enclosure was re-enforced in the second halfof the fifteenth century for defensive purposes.

At the back of the Main Tower, a large defensive spur, flanked by two turrets transformed the ground floor into the shape of a pentagon.In this side also a new body was added as a defensive barbican, with a small artillery barrier with three circular barrel turrets. And for safety a Moat was dug into the limestone rocks whose access was by a drawbridge.

On one of these turrets appears the shield of Pedro de Zúñiga y Avellaneda and his wife Catalina de Velasco y Mendoza, IICounts of the Miranda del Castañar, which dates this work at between 1478 and 1493.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carlos Garcia Garcia (18 months ago)
Un poco deteriorado exteriormente y sobre tofo muy bonitas vistas desde el torreon de una preciosa llanura castellana... Luego al bajar una cervecita fresca en la fabrica que hay en el interuor del castillo...
Hector Marquez (18 months ago)
No intentéis llegar con el GPS. Os mareareis intentando llegar y no lo conseguiréis. Hay un acceso peatonal muy mal indicado. Al final no dio tiempo a visitarlo intentando encontrar la forma de acceder. La próxima vez será !!!
Pablo Núñez (18 months ago)
Muy bonito. Muy bien conservado. Buenos trabajos de restauración interior. Falta lavabo para los visitantes.
luis francia (22 months ago)
El castillo está echo polvo y corre riesgo de derrumbe; la torre y media muralla, por movimiento del terreno. Aun así, parece que se está haciendo lo que se puede con él parece que poco a poco se restaura. Al parecer se hacen eventos en su interior, pues dispone de una gran explanada. Y hay visitas guiadas donde te cuentan su historia. A ver si otro día lo puedo disfrutar como se merece.
Paul B (3 years ago)
Nice little castle. The brewery inside is very cool and got some great bear
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