Färentuna Church

Ekerö, Sweden

Färentuna Church was built around the year 1175. The nave was enlarged in the 15th century when the church was under the protection of Karl Knutsson Bonde. The enlargement was made for his daughter’s weddings because the church was too small for all people. The latest notable reconstruction was made in 1732, when the medieval tower was replaced by the present wooden cap.

The pulpit of Färentuna church was made in 1701 as the monument of Carl XII’s victory in Narva battle. The oldest sculpture is a wooden Madonna carved in the 13th century. The runestone fragments U 20 and U 21, made in the 11th century, can be seen in the church wall to the left of the front gate. Together with the Hillersjö stone and the Snottsta and Vreta stones Färentuna runestones tells the story of the family of Gerlög and Inga. All of the Färentuna runestones are inscribed in the younger futhark.

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Details

Founded: 1175
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Sussi Redig (13 months ago)
Ricky sanshes (2 years ago)
en vacker liten kyrka i en härlig lantmiljö
Kerstin och Anders Janrik (2 years ago)
Fin gammal kyrka
LENNART NILSSON (3 years ago)
Mycket fin medeltidskyrka med fina takmålningar. Ibland ocksä hörvärda konserter.
Oskar Kuus (5 years ago)
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