Porta San Paolo

Rome, Italy

The Porta San Paolo is one of the southern gates in the 3rd-century Aurelian Walls of Rome. The Via Ostiense Museum is housed within the gatehouse.

The original name of the gate was Porta Ostiensis, because it was located of the beginning of via Ostiense, the road that connected Rome and Ostia where functioned as its main gate. Via Ostiense was an important arterial road, as evidenced by the fact that upon entering the gate of the same name, the road split, with one direction leading to the famous Emporium, the great market of Rome.

The gatehouse is flanked by two cylindrical towers, and has two entrances, which had been covered by a second, single-opening gate, built in front of the first by the Byzantine general Belisarius (530s–540s).

The structure is due to Maxentius, in the 4th century, but the two towers were heightened by Honorius. Its original — Latin — name was Porta Ostiensis, since it opened on the way to Ostia. Later, it was renamed to the Italian Porta San Paolo, because it was the exit of Rome that led to the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls.

In 549, Rome was under siege; the Ostrogoths of Totila entered through this gate, because of the treason of the Isaurian garrison. On 10 September 1943, two days after the armistice between the Allies and Italy had been agreed, Italian military and civil forces tried to block German seizure of the city, with 570 casualties.

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Details

Founded: 3rd century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rudi Hesse (9 months ago)
It seems a junction of every possible kind of traffic, an endless stream of cars and motobikes, trains, trams, the metro. The pyramide, the non catholic cemetery, this porta is a museum where you can walk up for free on top of the tower. Great place, best at dawn, see photo...
Frank Lennon (12 months ago)
Suberb, fantastic weather, great cocktails and ice cream.
Caleb (12 months ago)
It's free to the public, and if you go through to the top, there is a nice view of the pyramid across the street. There were some random items in this small museum that were interesting, but we mostly used it for the view on the roof.
Jiřina Lysáková (12 months ago)
Wow - the pyramid together with this monument is an incredible revelation to me. I did not believe that there might be something like this in Rome. If you want to have nice photos of this mess, I definitely recommend it either in the morning or in the evening. It's a nice walk from the spa.
Callum Duncan (13 months ago)
Well worth seeing if in the area. Amazing to think how long this gate has been in its place. We walked the street following the old walls from the baths to this gate. It was fascinating.
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