The Wiener Musikverein is a concert hall in the Innere Stadt borough of Vienna. It is the home of the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra. The 'Great Hall' (Großer Saal), due to its highly regarded acoustics, is considered one of the finest concert halls in the world, along with Berlin's Konzerthaus, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, and Boston's Symphony Hall. With the exception of Boston Symphony Hall, none of these halls were built in the modern era with the application of architectural acoustics, and all share a long, tall, and narrow shoebox shape.

The plans were designed by Danish architect Theophil Hansen in the Neoclassical style of an ancient Greek temple, including a concert hall and a smaller chamber music hall. The building was inaugurated on 6 January 1870. A major donor was Nikolaus Dumba, industrialist and liberal politician of Greek descent, whose name the Austrian government gave to one of the streets surrounding the Musikverein.

The Great Hall's lively acoustics are primarily based on Hansen's intuition, as he could not rely on any studies on architectural acoustics. The room's rectangular shape and proportions, its boxes and sculptures allow early and numerous sound reflections.

Today Musikverein is the most used venue for the annual Vienna New Year's Concert.

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Founded: 1870
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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kate McNeil (2 years ago)
Saw a classical music concert here which was excellent. The performers were in traditional dress and the music was stunning. However, venue staff weren't very welcoming, and contrary to the website, there is a dress code: no shorts, and (paid) coat check is mandatory. The average guest was a little dressed up: think collared shirt and no jeans. There also didn't appear to be any program brochures to help the audience follow along with the set list. No pictures are allowed inside the venue.
Tony Ramsden (2 years ago)
This is a typical Viennese music show, put on entirely for the tourists, like many others in Vienna. Having said that, it was very well done. The music was well played and sung, the musicians wore period costumes (aka Mozart), and the concert hall itself is quite impressive. The seats are comfortable and the acoustics are good as well.
Kimia G (2 years ago)
Went here for the Mozart orchestra which was fabulous. The costume style was victorian with powdered wigs and the conductor was interactive with the audience. There were quite a few empty seats and you didn't necessarily have to dress formally. The cloakrooms were 85 cents per piece and there was a buffet in LG floor for an additional charge. Fabulous venue at a convenient location with great prices for students (50% off!)
maria iacob (2 years ago)
The guided tour is very short-approx 15 minutes-NO PHOTO policy ( instead there should be no flash policy). Good guide, but if you are there for photos better buy a concert ticket. So if you are a music lover go to a concert, if you want to be for a view of the Room of New Year Concert Hall pay guided tour
Francesco Miceli (2 years ago)
Great theater with classical atmosphere. We listened to a Mozart and Strauss concert and weekend really enjoyed it! I can suggest balcony as a good view with lower price
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