Pietrapelosa Castle

Buzet, Croatia

Pietrapelosa is a castle in the Croatian part of Istria, now ruined. In the medieval period a family took their name from the castle. 'Pietrapelosa' comes from the Italian words meaning 'hairy stone' after the moss that has always grown on the walls of the castle. It is one of the best-preserved of the Istrian castles.

History

Pietrapelosa is a few kilometers west of Buzet in a strategic location at the head of the Bračana valley. It is first mentioned in a document of 965 AD. in a deed recording its gift by Rodaold, patriarch of Aquileia to the bishopric of Poreč. In the 13th century it was given to a family of German knights who assumed the name of the castle, 'de Pietrapelosa'. The castle was the seat of the Aquileian lieutenant governor of Istria. The Venetian commander Taddeo d'Este conquered the castle and abolished the secular rule of the patriarchs of Aquileia in 1421, with Istria being divided between the Republic of Venice and the Habsburg County of Pazin. The Venetian Council of Tengranted the castle to the nobleman Nicolò Gravisi in 1440, giving him the title if Marquis of Pietrapelosa. He renovated the castle for use as a summer residence. In 1635 a fire destroyed the interior of the castle, but it was restored and inhabited until the 18th century. The Gravis family owned the castle until the final abolition of the feudal system in 1869. They were the only aristocratic family in Koper to own such an estate.

Building

The castle was surrounded by three-story walls, which are still intact. It included a main four-story polygonal watchtower, sometimes also used as a residence. There was also a house and a palace chapel of St. Mary Magdalene dating from the 12th century. The chapel is built in the classic Istrian style with one nave and a bell tower. A residential area was built on a crag beside the castle with no walls. The castle avoided destruction throughout the many wars that ravaged Istria. However, it fell into ruin after being abandoned, and has only recently been restored. From the castle there is a dramatic view of Northern Istria.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Buzet, Croatia
See all sites in Buzet

Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Igor Kovcin (2 years ago)
Old fort on the top of the hill,let your imagitation work...
Ewa Dacko (2 years ago)
In summer 2018, the castle is closed for renovation and there is no access to the construction site.
Deni Zubin (3 years ago)
Awesome place!
Sebastjan Ugrin (3 years ago)
A perfect destination for one day trip. Medieval castle in ruins with breathtaking wiew on the valley. Can be reached by car, on foot or even mtb. Highly recommended for history and mistery lovers and also all others, even families with kids.
Ivy Purple Heart (4 years ago)
Historical and architectural gem, high on a cliff, blended in rock, old castle, partially renewed but needs a lot more work, road to it is asfalted but very narrow, forgotten, poorly marked on google maps and roads, should be more visited and valued and used
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