St. George's Cathedral

Piran, Slovenia

Above the compact Piran town centre reigns St. George's Cathedral, which gives the city its special character. It was probably built in the 12th century, but no exact data in this regard exists.

In the 14th century, it was built to its present size. In the year 1344, on the Day of St. George, the cathedral was consecrated by nine bishops from near and far. It acquired its present appearance after Baroque renovation in the year 1637. The Bell Tower was completed in 1608, and the Baptistery in the year 1650. During these years, reinforcements were made to the hill on which the cathedral rests.

The supporting walls were built in the year 1641, and on the sea side, the hill was fortified with stone arches. The construction of the stone arches began in the year 1663 and lasted until 1804. They were seriously dilapidated due to the effects of erosion, and thus had to be reconstructed and restored in 1998.

In the year 1737, St George's Cathedral acquired seven marble altars. Of the preserved works of art, the two sculptures of St. George are particularly worth seeing. The larger one is from the 17th century and is the work of an unknown sculptor. The smaller one is silver-plated and was made by a Piran-based goldsmith's workshop. The wall paintings are the work of the Venetian school. The two big paintings (Mass in Bolsena and St. George's Miracle) date from the beginning of the 17th century and were painted by Angelo de Coster.

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Details

Founded: 1344
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

More Information

www.portoroz.si

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Evgenii Danilov (19 months ago)
The great church
Andrej Branc (2 years ago)
Beautiful church inside and out, great view down to Tartini square and over the bay on the other side.
Richard Ashcroft (2 years ago)
The Venetian Renaissance church, which dominates the view of Piran from many vantage points, sits precariously atop an unstable hill near the edge of a cliff, over which it could potentially tumble. Every so often there are earth stabilization works to prevent this. From the church grounds you can look over the jumbled roofs of the town, down at the rocky beach or the town square, or over the Bay of Trieste.
Łukasz Stachnik (2 years ago)
Great place to see Piran and coastal architecture, and few churches. I recommend to see it in September as there are not many tourists. Near orthodox church, there is a tower (entrance costs 2 euro) with a great view over Piran. Great!
Peter Milo (2 years ago)
A very nice historical place with the best sunset of piran. A garden on top of the town with a cliff side, really georgeous.
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