Hrastovlje Church

Črni Kal, Slovenia

Holy Trinity Church is a historical building in Hrastovlje. There are two hypotheses about its origin. According to the first, it is a Romanesque church from the 12th century. According to the second, it is an example of the Istrian variant of Early Venetian Renaissance architecture from the 15th century. The church stands behind a wall that the local population built to protect itself from Turkish attacks in the 16th century.

The church and wall were built on bare rock, and for this reason do not have deep foundations. The church is built mostly out of stone, as is typical for the entire coastal region. The stones were never entirely covered in an outer layer of plaster, and it is thus possible to see how the church was built. One can see that top of the church spire was rebuilt at some time, although it is not known why. The church is topped with tiles made of thick plates. These are characteristic for older roofs in the Mediterranean region.

The church has only 2 windows (a third window was walled up in the past) as a result of the local weather conditions. In summer, a room with a small window was protected from the sun, while in winter it was protected from the bora. Because of the low number of windows, the inside of the church is however very dark. In 1896, a hole was knocked in the northern wall to create a new window, but unfortunately some of the frescoes in the church were destroyed at the same time.

Despite the lack of windows, the church nonetheless used to be better lit than it is today. This is the result of the addition of the powerful outer wall, which robs the church of much of its light.

Because of its height, the church is classed as a multi-layered church. The church in Hrastovlje differs from all other pilgrim churches in that its bell-tower is located on the western side and in that all other pilgrim churches have small wooden towers.

The church is 11.7 metres long and 6.05 metres wide and thereby one of the smallest churches in the area. It is not even as large as the average village church. Some claim that the church is an example of IstrianRenaissance architecture from the second half of the 15th century.

The appearance of the northwestern entrance to the church, as known today, dates back to around 1776. The original entrance was probably next to the bell-tower.

The church has been painted with Gothic frescoes by Johannes de Castua in 1490. Some of them include letters in the Glagolitic script. The most famous of these frescoes is a Dance of Death or 'Danse Macabre'.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Slovenia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Boyu Tan (13 months ago)
A small Church but with a very beautiful Fresco that is done Without any extravagant but down to earth beauty. A wonder it could be kept so well the present day. Worthy if a visit if near to Koper or Piran which any tourist will be when in Slovenia.. just make a detour of 30 minutes or less from these places and you will have a feast if your eyes.
Vesna Črnjač (14 months ago)
Very well guided tour of historical sites, something special
Stefano Bruno (15 months ago)
A wonderful paintings cycle. Very nice
Katja Cingerle (2 years ago)
The best live guidance, beautiful historical church
Martina Leljak (3 years ago)
Great historical place to visit. Very nice views around the church. Inside the church there are very nice wall frescoes, among those there is also well known Dance of Death. Also entrance fee isn't so expensive.
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