Medieval Hum town was first mentioned in 1102 in the deed of gift by Marquis Ulrich II. The passage through the early 12th century double entrance gates, and then this one from 1562 leads us into the square. The exceptionally small area has all town features: the town loggia, nobility and folk houses, and the parish church with the priest residence.

The castle was located on the site of the current Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (erected in 1802) on the highest point of the town, which allowed its control of the surrounding area. Rectangular in shape, 30 x 35 meters (typical dimensions of the time) and connected by two streets with the twin town gates, which facilitated better communication and protection. The castle was entered from the inside, from the town. Despite its basic defensive purpose, in the earlier era it was a seat of its owners – the feudal lords under the Patriarch of Aquileia.

Ever since the prehistoric times until the ruins of the Venetians in 1797, Hum was a defensive border town, full of life, conflicts, different rulers, war and peace. From the antiquity to the Late Middle Ages, it was used as a defensive castle of an estate. Often destroyed and renovated, it finally fell under the Venetian rule in 1412, which restored it completely to defend its own borders. Its most probable final fall occurred during the Uskok War (1612-1618), when the entire town was burned down and the castle was never renovated. Its stone was gradually being taken for building houses. Any trace of it was finally lost following the erection of the church.

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Address

Hum, Buzet, Croatia
See all sites in Buzet

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

www.istria-culture.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tea Horvat (6 months ago)
Nice to see, very small so you can practically pass through. The parking ticket costs 7kn for the whole day.
Andy Taylor (8 months ago)
Hum...what a lovely little town. One of the smallest towns in the world apparently. Very pleasant little stroll, it'll only take you about 15 minutes to see the whole place! The Aura brandy shop is worth a visit too!
Gniewosz Walczak (15 months ago)
A bit to crowded for me but nice
Matej Kovač (15 months ago)
Not much to see, half of buildings are souvenir shops. Nice to visit if you are nearby
Mia Moćan (15 months ago)
Very small and adorable old city
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