Apollonia was an ancient Greek city located on the right bank of the Vjosë river. Apollonia was founded in 588 BCE by Greek colonists from Corfu and Corinth, on a site where native Illyrian tribes lived, and was perhaps the most important of the several classical towns known as Apollonia.

Apollonia flourished under Roman rule and was noted by Cicero in his Philippicae as magna urbs et gravis, a great and important city. Christianity was established in the city at an early stage, and bishops from Apollonia were present during the First Council of Ephesus (431) and the Council of Chalcedon (451).

Its decline, however, began in the 3rd century AD, when an earthquake changed the path of the Aoös, causing the harbour to silt up and the inland area to become a malaria-ridden swamp. The city became increasingly uninhabitable as the inland swamp expanded, and the nearby settlement of Avlona (modern-day Vlorë) became dominant. By the end of antiquity, the city was largely depopulated, hosting only a small Christian community. This community (which probably is part of the site of the old city) built on a nearby hill the church of the Dormition of the Theotokos, part of the Ardenica Monastery.

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Pojan, Fier, Albania
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Details

Founded: 588 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
albania.al

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edvin Rushitaj (11 months ago)
A great quiet place to spend a beautiful weekend with family and friends. Beautiful museum with lots of artifacts ti view. If you're into history and ancient civilization this is a must visit place.
Agnieszka K. (12 months ago)
Worth a visit and take a sip of history. For lovers of antiquity. PS - One of the few clean places so far encountered in this country. PS 2 - Unfortunately the local men acted loud, stared and commented on us among themselves. They acted as if they had come down from a tree and had not seen the woman before. The security guard followed me and took pictures my bud secretly.
Olga Kovalenko (12 months ago)
The amazing place to walk around and see historical heritage.
Elisa Janku (17 months ago)
Some trash laying around and some of the thinks are damaged. But its a large area, nice to walk around and explore.
Jonida Koçillari (2 years ago)
A lot of fun to visit and take pictures. More to see than you'd think at first. A little tricky to get to. Easy to walk around although it is on top of a small hill. Extremely enjoyable.
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