Holy Trinity Church

Berat, Albania

The Holy Trinity Church has a cross shaped plan with a dome. It is composed of the nave, narthex (entrance area) and the altar alcove. In the church many Byzantine architecture features have been skilfully used such as the inner organization of the space and the decorative and illuminative systems. These features, together with the pyramidal shape, forms and proportions give the church a picturesque appearance. The Byzantine architectural elements in the church have been combined with western architectural elements belonging to the same period.

Inside the church are two columns with reused capitals (thought to have been taken from classical ruins in the city). An inscription inside the church contains the name of Andronicus Paleologus (Governor of the province of Berat from 1302 to 1326), indicating that the church must have been built during the 13th or 14th century with his financial support.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Léa K (2 years ago)
The church has a cross in square plan with a dome. It is composed of the naos, narthex, and the altar alcove. In the church have been skillfully used many byzantine architecture features such as the inner organization of the volume and the decorative and illuminative systems. This features together with the pyramidal shape, forms and proportions give to the church a picturesque view. The Byzantine architectural elements in the church have been combined with western architectural elements belonging to the same period. Inside has two columns with reused capitals that are thought to have been taken from the antique ruins of the citv. In an inscription inside the church has been written the name of closed permanently :( Andronicus Paleologus, who was Governor of the Province of Belgrade (Berat) during 1302-1326. According to this inscription the church must have been built during the XIV century with the financial support of Andronicus Paleologus Asan.
Ermest Sollaku (2 years ago)
Alright its a very nice church,but faces some real issues. The government and the department of the sports and culture has to something about it . This chuch needs some serious restoration,otherwise all the pictures and everything inside of it will fade away. Im not a religion man,but for the people who believe it’s something difficult and hard to face.
Ludo P (2 years ago)
Beautiful but no longer a monument of the state - it is now part of the Orthodox Church. This means that there are some restrictions with clothes and we couldn’t get in as my wife was wearing shorts and the keeper screamed “this is not a disco!”. 1 minute later, a group of older mixed people in shorts and dresses entered the church with no protest from the keeper. I guess the dress code depends on the age? We did not experience this in any other Orthodox Church in Albania.
Julian Ruçi (JR) (3 years ago)
Holy Trinity Church ( Kisha Shën Triadhës ) A very Beautiful Byzantine Church. Cultural Monument.
Spiros Theocharis (5 years ago)
A beautiful Byzantine church on the rocky Akropolis of Berat. Unfortunately it is locked and it doesn’t seem to have opening hours. Apparently the Greek inscriptions inside the church disturb some people.
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