Borsh Castle (also known as Sopot Castle) dates from Antiquity, and its fortifications follow the trace of an acropolis, with four subsequent phases of reconstruction, ranging from the early Byzantine period to the late Middle Ages.

The site is first mentioned in the early 13th century, when archbishop Demetrios Chomatenos wrote of the 'archonship of Sopotos', part of the region of Vagenetia. In 1258, the Despot of Epirus Michael II Komnenos Doukas gave the castle along with Buthrotum and the island of Corfu as dowry for his daughter Helena to Manfred, King of Sicily. It came back under Epirote control soon thereafter, before being once again ceded by Nikephoros I Komnenos Doukas to Charles I of Anjou in 1279. The area returned again to Epirote hands in the subsequent decades, but in the Epirote rebellion against Palaiologan Byzantine rule in 1338–39, it remained loyal to Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos.

Following the Ottoman conquest, a cadaster from 1431 lists Sopot with 60 households, and as capital of a nahiye. In 1456, troops of King Alfonso V of Aragon were operating in the area of Sobato against the Ottomans. In 1470 it was under Venetian control, under the jurisdiction of the governor of Corfu; at the end of the Ottoman–Venetian War of 1463–1479, the Ottomans laid claim to it and apparently received it, for in 1488 the local Albanian population rebelled against Ottoman rule.

The walls of the castle, which follow the ancient fortifications, survive. In the interior, the medieval fortress was divided through a wall in two. Triangular towers were added later, probably during the middle Byzantine period. In the interior of the castle stand ruins of various buildings and cisterns.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Borsh, Albania
See all sites in Borsh

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Harkacsi (7 months ago)
Good afternoon program with family, can be do it with children too. Nice views. Recomennd
zimbo snortch (7 months ago)
Go there if you will have a chance the place is epic with stunning views and literally no people around!
gridi zaja (9 months ago)
Old beautiful castle. It has a mosque inside. 20 minutes from Borsh center.
Nov ID Arberor (11 months ago)
excellent view ancient ruins
Honza Březovský (2 years ago)
Beautiful spot, even in the October rain. Also one of the few geocaches on the Albanian coast can be found here. Nice walk.
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