Drugolo Castle

Drugolo, Italy

The Drugolo castle is located in the village with same name along the road that leads from Padenghe to Bedizzole in the morainic hills. Its construction is dated to the 10th century, perhaps by the Lombards.

It has a square plan with two corner towers and is positioned on a wall that raises it considerably, has a drawbridge and Ghibelline battlements; towards the end of the 14th century the perimeter walls were rebuilt. In its history it was owned by the Vimercati of Milan until 1436, then passed to the Averoldi of Brescia until 1935, the Lanciani Rocca and now the barons Lanni della Quara.

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Address

Via Drugolo 2, Drugolo, Italy
See all sites in Drugolo

Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Heinz Kaufmann (3 months ago)
Well restored historic castle with beautuful views overlooking Lake Garda.
Kevin Prüssner (4 months ago)
Beautiful italian castle with a stunning view over lake garda. I recommend to run from the lake to the castle and then back down through padenghe. Nice workout!
Andreas Ferbert (4 months ago)
Nice castle wich is still alive- literally spoken: a few families are living within the castle walls.
Maria Bagalut (13 months ago)
Nice and cozy place. The view is fantastic!
Elena Damiani (13 months ago)
Unexpectedly interesting and beautiful
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