Chignolo Po Castle

Chignolo Po, Italy

Chignolo Po Castle is a beautiful eighteenth-century patrician residence, museum of art and customs, called 'the Versailles of Lombardy'. It contains important and precious testimonies of the lavish world of Lombard and Venetian nobility.

The oldest part of the castle, born as a fortress on a hill, is the great Tower, from which a long stretch of the Po (Cuneulus super Padum). It is believed that it was built by the King Liutprando around 740 AD, when Pavia was the capital of the gods Longobardi, with the purpose of serving as a defense fortress and a garrison on the Po and on the Via di Monte Bordone, subsequently named via Francigena - Romea that connected Northern Europe with Rome.

In front of the fort, towards the north, stands the Borgo, which was entirely rebuilt in the 1600. It is characterized as an architectural complex protected at the entrance by a moat, by two garries, and by four ravels (towers) on the far sides.

The castle, in a short time, starting from the XIII century, became one of the greatest Feudi Lombardi, on which i first settled Pusterla, until, in the 1340, this family was involved in an anti-viscosity and fiercely exterminated conspiracy.Then came in Federici and Cusani, which increased to the maximum the power of the Castle, also receiving continuous privileges and concessions from the Kings and Dukes of Milan.

From 1700 to 1730 it was expanded and transformed from a medieval fortress into a real one 18thcentury palace where they stayed Popes, Emperors, Kings, Princes and Archdukes.

Tiepolesque school artists were entrusted with the realization of the stuccos and paintings that embellish the halls of representation of the Castle.The work was carried out by the will and financing of the owner of the time, the Cardinal Agostino Cusani Visconti (1655 - 1715), who was Ambassador of the Pope to the Venetian Republic and to the Court of Louis XIV in Paris, as well as the Bishop of Pavia.

The spectacular baroque courtyard, the large frescoed halls of Tiepolesque school, the refinement of the stuccos and decorations, the dominant tower with its masurized turreted stone, all immersed in a gentle rural landscape, make this monument one of the most important Italian historical residences.

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Details

Founded: 740 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wil Boucher (2 years ago)
Amazing venue
Marcus Malysa (2 years ago)
Beautiful location. Celebrated an amazing wedding and this venue added so much to it. All of the staff were great - very friendly and attentive!
J Chan (3 years ago)
Went there only to discover they are closed on weekdays. Looks beautiful from the outside. set in a small little town with friendly people.
J C (3 years ago)
Went there only to discover they are closed on weekdays. Looks beautiful from the outside. set in a small little town with friendly people.
A 13 (3 years ago)
An hour drive from MIlano for nothing, as we could not enter with our dog, as only small dogs are allowed. This vital piece of information is missing on the Castel's site and is not mentioned anywhere else. Shame, as small dogs are often much noisier and much worse behaving, than friendly and well trained bigger dogs. A policy in need of re-thinking or a statement on the site is due.
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