Visconti Castle

Pavia, Italy

The Visconti Castle in Pavia was built in 1360 by Galeazzo II Visconti, soon after the taking of the city, a free city-state until then. The credited architect is Bartolino da Novara. The castle used to be the main residence of the Visconti family, while the political capital of the state was Milan. North of the castle a wide park was enclosed, also including the Certosa of Pavia, founded 1396 according to a vow of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, meant to be a sort of private chapel of the Visconti dynasty. The Battle of Pavia (1525), climax of the Italian Wars, took place inside the castle park.

There are some significant proofs of the great frescoes showing battles, hunting and middle-class life scenes, which decorated rooms, porches and loggias. Another excellent proof is the complete decoration of the splendid Blue Room with its gold and lapislazuli. Perhaps it was the seat of the Visconti library with its 1.000 manuscripts and commissioned by Petrarch.

It presently houses the Civic Museums of Pavia (Museo Civici di Pavia) including the Pinacoteca Malaspina, Museo Archeologico and Sala Longobarda, Sezioni Medioevale e Rinascimentale Quadreria dell’800 (Collezione Morone), Museo del Risorgimento, Museo Robecchi Bricchetti, and the Cripta di Sant’Eusebio.

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Details

Founded: 1360
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michela Barisonzi (11 months ago)
Stunning castle and amazing gardens. Absolutely worth a visit.
Tatiana Torres (11 months ago)
This was an amazing experience! You should visit and enjoy every single detail
James Kent-Nye (12 months ago)
Absolutely brilliant museum - I got in free for being in my early 20's too. Very interesting mixture of historic architectural, artifact and artistic pieces. Definitely worth a visit, even just to see the castle and it's grounds.
Roxana Meaney (13 months ago)
Just stunning Roman artifacts beautifully displayed. The modern donated art collection was also beautiful. Very impressive
Valerio Meletti (14 months ago)
Great location, a stunningly beautiful castle. The exhibition was finely curated, with a special care for children (our kid was given a free dedicated booklet with interactive activities). Staff is very very kind. Top notch
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