Visconti-Sforza Castle

Vigevano, Italy

The Visconti-Sforza Castle is a Middle Age castle located in the centre of the city of Vigevano, Lombardy. 

Luchino Visconti, Lord of Milan and ruler of Vigevano since 1337, began to transform the existing fortification into a local residence for his family. The construction was continued by Gian Galeazzo Visconti, first Duke of Milan, and completed by his heirs, Ludovico il Moro and his grandchild Gian Galeazzo Sforza. Donato Bramante had been working on the project of the castle. Leonardo Da Vinci is known to have frequented Vigevano and supposedly attended to the works. The castle was completed in the last years of the 15th century.

The result was a wide resort covering a surface of 70,000 square meters. The castle consisted of several buildings arranged elliptically and serving different purposes. The imposing main body (Maschio or Ducal Palace) had a U-shape plan with the two wings facing the center of the courtyard of the castle. The Ladies' Palace (Loggia delle Dame), built by Bramante, was reserved to the Duchess and the ladies of the court. A building for the breeding of falcons (Falconiera) and stables for horses (Scuderie) were also part of the castle. The Falconiera was connected to the Ducal Palace through a loggia elevated over the ground. The tower of the castle (Bramante Tower) was modelled after that of the Milan Castle, designed by Filarete. Raised to be visible from the center of Vigevano, it was completed in 1491.

The 14th and 15th centuries was a period of great transformation for Vigevano. The adjacent piazza of the city (Piazza Ducale) was constructed and other buildings erected: the Rocca Vecchia and the Palazzo Sanseverino (or Rocca Nuova). The nearby Rocca Vecchia was connected to the castle through a covered and elevated road (Strada Coperta).

At the end of the 15th century, the castle was frequented by Beatrice d'Este, wife of Ludovico il Moro, who gave prestige to Vigevano as a courteous residence.

The castle continued to be used by the members of the Sforza House.[5] Francesco II Sforza, the last ruler of the House, died in Vigevano on 24 October 1535.

After the end of the Sforza dynasty, under the Spanish regime, the use of the castle suffered a slow decline. Before the Baroque era, when the facade of the Sant'Ambrogio Cathedral was completed, the Piazza Ducale was connected to the entrance of the tower and to the court of the castle.

Since the 18th century the castle had been used for military purposes, initially by the Austrian and then by the Italian Army.

Ceased its military use in 1968, the castle remained abandoned until 1980, when the first restorations began. Since then, a part of the castle have been progressively opened to the public. The restored rooms of the castle host today the city museum, while the largest portion remains unused. Part of the Scuderie is used for exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: c. 1337
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Riccardo Righi (12 months ago)
My place, my hometown! This square was in 1492... no words, one of the best in Italy
Trudy Hindmarsh (14 months ago)
Wonderful! Very Italian. A bit off the beaten track but well worth a visit.
Tim Hoy (14 months ago)
Great starters and pizza, good wine and beer. Beautiful evening setting in the central plaza with lots of activity. Eat some great food and watch the locals passing by.
Kim Floriance (14 months ago)
Historical place with a sign of Leonardo da Vinci. Interesting museums, Piazza Ducale, cozy restaurants.
Nata Popa (17 months ago)
Just lovely. It was a lovely sunny day and piazza Ducale is just stunning.
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