Castellar de la Frontera Castle

Castillo de Castellar, Spain

Castellar de la Frontera is a village within a castle surrounded by the walls of a well preserved Moorish-Christian fortress. It is located within the Parque Natural de Los Alcornocales next to a reservoir formed by the Guadarranque River.

The history of the village goes back to prehistoric times and the Bronze Age, after which the place became a medieval fortress. The prehistoric presence is still evident in the many caves around the area, where enthusiasts can see the wonderful cave drawings as proof of its heritage. It played an important role in the wars between the Spanish and the Muslims. In such a high up advantageous strategic position, peoples of many cultures wanted to control this strong vantage point.

The village was conquered and won back between Fernando III, the Moors and then Juan II, who described it as 'such a wonderful, strong town'. After the many battles of medieval times, by October 1650 Teresa María Arias de Saavedra, the Countess of Castellar, took possession of the town and later it was in the hands of the Medinaceli family.

The village was abandoned in the 1970s and its inhabitants moved to the aptly named Nuevo Castellar. The derelict state of the village attracted a number of Germans who took over the empty houses and built temporary dwellings outside the walls. The village was later repopulated.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

angela banks (13 months ago)
OK, the little house had faults, but the receptionist was lovely and the place amazing. I would go back!
J. Bezzina (14 months ago)
A memorable stay very welcoming staff, clean and spacious. Definitely would love to return even in winter time.
Murad Ahmed (15 months ago)
Great to walk around an active castle. You can put yourself in purples shoes from olden days. Great sunsets.
Andy Green (16 months ago)
Beautiful place to stay
Andressa Kellen de Oliveira (2 years ago)
It's a perfect place for visit
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