Olvera Castle

Olvera, Spain

Olvera castle was built in the late 12th century as part of the defensive system of the Emirate of Granada. The castle was seized from the original Moorish builders and occupants and redesigned and expanded under King Alfonso XI in 1327.

Situated at the highest point of the town, the castle has an irregularly-shaped elongated triangle that fits the form of the rock base.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ryan Meskill (2 years ago)
Absolutely wonderful spot for a quick hike up the hill and views from the castle. Not for the faint of heart-it gets quite breezy up there and the ledges aren't terribly high, but you really can't beat the view. 2€, paid at the tourist center and then he walks you down to let you in and leaves you on your own in the castle-one if the most fair entrance fees I've ever paid. Plenty of free parking around town if you don't mind walking a bit up the hill. If you're coming from Ronda or the Roman ruins definetely worth a stop!
Emilia Woskowiak (2 years ago)
Super spot. Very small village o the steep top of the hill. Nice quiet and picturesque village as well. For 2 hours to see everything
Jeni Worden (2 years ago)
A real find. A short but steep walk up from the almost deserted car park led us to the church square with some amazing views. On a bright sunny early autumn afternoon, I really wished that I had my camera and not just my phone. The church was well worth the €2 each entrance fee, so typically Spanish in decor with beautifully dressed statues of the Virgin Mary and other Catholic saints. We were the only visitors so had plenty of time to look and admire. We paid to go up to the castle but decided against the steep climb and spent half an hour in the Granary museum ( La Cilla). The very helpful lady in the ticket office lent us a book with perfect English translations of all the explanations of the exhibits, very welcome. I'm sure that if I had had the energy to complete the visit to the castle ramparts, this would be a 5 star review.
Ken Lotze (2 years ago)
A long steep walk up. Free. You can go inside and to the top. Good views. Not a day trip. A stopover will do.
Tweed Tango (2 years ago)
This village is lovely, I went by chance to see the church as I was nearby, but arrived when it had closed. It was very windy at the top that day, so take good shoes. Steep roads, traditional houses, quiet, and beautifully kept. There is also an old Arab castle one can visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Roman Walls of Lugo

Roman Walls of Lugo are an exceptional architectural, archaeological and constructive legacy of Roman engineering, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The Walls are built of internal and external stone facings of slate with some granite, with a core filling of a conglomerate of slate slabs and worked stone pieces from Roman buildings, interlocked with lime mortar.

Their total length of 2117 m in the shape of an oblong rectangle occupies an area of 1.68 ha. Their height varies between 8 and 10 m, with a width of 4.2 m, reaching 7 m in some specific points. The walls still contain 85 external towers, 10 gates (five of which are original and five that were opened in modern times), four staircases and two ramps providing access to the walkway along the top of the walls, one of which is internal and the other external. Each tower contained access stairs leading from the intervallum to the wall walk of town wall, of which a total of 21 have been discovered to date.

The defences of Lugo are the most complete and best preserved example of Roman military architecture in the Western Roman Empire.

Despite the renovation work carried out, the walls conserve their original layout and the construction features associated with their defensive purpose, with walls, battlements, towers, fortifications, both modern and original gates and stairways, and a moat.

Since they were built, the walls have defined the layout and growth of the city, which was declared a Historical-Artistic Ensemble in 1973, forming a part of it and becoming an emblematic structure that can be freely accessed to walk along. The local inhabitants and visitors alike have used them as an area for enjoyment and as a part of urban life for centuries.

The fortifications were added to UNESCO"s World Heritage List in late 2000 and are a popular tourist attraction.