Olvera Castle

Olvera, Spain

Olvera castle was built in the late 12th century as part of the defensive system of the Emirate of Granada. The castle was seized from the original Moorish builders and occupants and redesigned and expanded under King Alfonso XI in 1327.

Situated at the highest point of the town, the castle has an irregularly-shaped elongated triangle that fits the form of the rock base.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ryan Meskill (12 months ago)
Absolutely wonderful spot for a quick hike up the hill and views from the castle. Not for the faint of heart-it gets quite breezy up there and the ledges aren't terribly high, but you really can't beat the view. 2€, paid at the tourist center and then he walks you down to let you in and leaves you on your own in the castle-one if the most fair entrance fees I've ever paid. Plenty of free parking around town if you don't mind walking a bit up the hill. If you're coming from Ronda or the Roman ruins definetely worth a stop!
Emilia Woskowiak (12 months ago)
Super spot. Very small village o the steep top of the hill. Nice quiet and picturesque village as well. For 2 hours to see everything
Jeni Worden (13 months ago)
A real find. A short but steep walk up from the almost deserted car park led us to the church square with some amazing views. On a bright sunny early autumn afternoon, I really wished that I had my camera and not just my phone. The church was well worth the €2 each entrance fee, so typically Spanish in decor with beautifully dressed statues of the Virgin Mary and other Catholic saints. We were the only visitors so had plenty of time to look and admire. We paid to go up to the castle but decided against the steep climb and spent half an hour in the Granary museum ( La Cilla). The very helpful lady in the ticket office lent us a book with perfect English translations of all the explanations of the exhibits, very welcome. I'm sure that if I had had the energy to complete the visit to the castle ramparts, this would be a 5 star review.
Ken Lotze (14 months ago)
A long steep walk up. Free. You can go inside and to the top. Good views. Not a day trip. A stopover will do.
Tweed Tango (16 months ago)
This village is lovely, I went by chance to see the church as I was nearby, but arrived when it had closed. It was very windy at the top that day, so take good shoes. Steep roads, traditional houses, quiet, and beautifully kept. There is also an old Arab castle one can visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.