Olvera Castle

Olvera, Spain

Olvera castle was built in the late 12th century as part of the defensive system of the Emirate of Granada. The castle was seized from the original Moorish builders and occupants and redesigned and expanded under King Alfonso XI in 1327.

Situated at the highest point of the town, the castle has an irregularly-shaped elongated triangle that fits the form of the rock base.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ryan Meskill (3 years ago)
Absolutely wonderful spot for a quick hike up the hill and views from the castle. Not for the faint of heart-it gets quite breezy up there and the ledges aren't terribly high, but you really can't beat the view. 2€, paid at the tourist center and then he walks you down to let you in and leaves you on your own in the castle-one if the most fair entrance fees I've ever paid. Plenty of free parking around town if you don't mind walking a bit up the hill. If you're coming from Ronda or the Roman ruins definetely worth a stop!
Emilia Woskowiak (3 years ago)
Super spot. Very small village o the steep top of the hill. Nice quiet and picturesque village as well. For 2 hours to see everything
Jeni Worden (3 years ago)
A real find. A short but steep walk up from the almost deserted car park led us to the church square with some amazing views. On a bright sunny early autumn afternoon, I really wished that I had my camera and not just my phone. The church was well worth the €2 each entrance fee, so typically Spanish in decor with beautifully dressed statues of the Virgin Mary and other Catholic saints. We were the only visitors so had plenty of time to look and admire. We paid to go up to the castle but decided against the steep climb and spent half an hour in the Granary museum ( La Cilla). The very helpful lady in the ticket office lent us a book with perfect English translations of all the explanations of the exhibits, very welcome. I'm sure that if I had had the energy to complete the visit to the castle ramparts, this would be a 5 star review.
Ken Lotze (3 years ago)
A long steep walk up. Free. You can go inside and to the top. Good views. Not a day trip. A stopover will do.
Tweed Tango (3 years ago)
This village is lovely, I went by chance to see the church as I was nearby, but arrived when it had closed. It was very windy at the top that day, so take good shoes. Steep roads, traditional houses, quiet, and beautifully kept. There is also an old Arab castle one can visit.
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