Ardales Castle

Ardales, Spain

Castillo de la Peña was originally a prehistorical settlement, an Iberian fortified village and, very probably, the location of a Roman temple. The current fortification is located here because Omar ben Harfsun conquered the Peña, where originally a representative of the Cordoba state was settled (al-Tayubi) in the year 883 AD.

Omar, the leader of the Mozarabic riot in the mountain ranges of Malaga, fortified the Sajrat Farda Fardaris. He enclosed the natural perimeter with walls and towers and built on the top a square fortress.

The Peña de Ardales Castle is a clear landmark in the area and remains in time since the Middle Ages. From the castle and from the Turón Castle, which has been reinforced, the Castilian attacks were repelled in the 12th, 13th and 14th centuries. La Peña was definately conquered by the troops lead by King Juan II and established themselves in Teba Castle in 1453.

Now, the Peña de Ardales Castle stores architectural remains from the walls, from the door of Justice and from the fortress. The fortress was bakly damaged because it was destroyed during the War of Independence.

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Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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andaluciarustica.com

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Caco Moonsound (3 years ago)
Pequeño pueblo, Ardales, de paso para visitar el Caminito del Rey, el valle
OLIVIA ALONSO SÁNCHEZ (3 years ago)
Muy bonita
Mariabel Sanchez (3 years ago)
En el pueblo de Ardales se halla un castillo digno de ver,un sitio para conocer y disfrutar de sus bonitas vistas pasear y ver lo maravilloso paisajes de este bonito pueblo
Tamara Gutierrez (3 years ago)
Ardales buen pueblo. El castillo nada de especial. Pero el. Entorno merece mucho la pena
Vic Tor (3 years ago)
Only opened on weekends
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