Museo de Málaga

Málaga, Spain

The Museo de Málaga, which was actually constituted in 1973, opened in 2016 in the impressive Palacio de la Aduana. It has brought together the former Museo Provincial de Bellas Artes (Provincial Museum of Fine Arts) and Museo Arqueológico Provincial.Málaga now joins Almería, Cádiz, Huelva and Jaén in having a 'provincial museum' in their respective capital cities; while Seville, Córdoba and Granada have separate fine arts and archaeological museums.  

The 18,000 square metre museum has eight rooms, the first five dedicated to archaeology and the other three to fine arts. There are just over 2,000 pieces in the fine arts collection and more than 15,000 in the archaeology collection.

The Fine Arts section includes works by Luis de Morales, Luca Giordano, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Antonio del Castillo, Alonso Cano, Pedro de Mena, Jusepe de Ribera, Francisco Zurbarán, Diego Velázquez, Francisco de Goya, Federico de Madrazo, Ramón Casas, José Moreno Carbonero, Enrique Simonet, Joaquín Sorolla, Léon Bonnat, Franz Marc and Pablo Picasso.

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Details

Founded: 1973
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

The Don (4 months ago)
It's huge and full of history, nice to know a bit of background...malaga have immense and diverse cultures .
Maria Fernandez (4 months ago)
We really enjoyed the fantastic collection of art and archeology of this museum. It's open from Tuesday to Sunday in a very convenient schedule and the EU citizens have free access. The other nationalities is only €1,50. The personel is really friendly and helpful. It is a world class facility and really worth the visit.
DIMITRIOS PLATARAS (4 months ago)
Very interesting museum. First floor has art exhibition while second floor is dedicated to archaeology
Elizabeth Nash (6 months ago)
Here you can learn all about the Malaga region's history and artistic cultural heritage - everything from cave paintings to Picasso and beyond throughout Pre-history, the Phoenician, Roman, Islamic and Spanish historical periods. There are fascinating archaeological and artistic exhibits, all well described. Entrance is free for citizens of the EU. Take advantage while you can!
Larson Emerson (7 months ago)
What a lovely museum! Saw one of my favorite painting, the one in Venice with the bridge and all the bright colors! The museum is very nice and with many COVID retrictions in place, so you’ll feel save. A thing that I loved is that from October until December is open from 9am until 9pm! So it’s a great place to visit when it is already dark outside The museum is free of charge from all from EU, which is amazing, unfortunately there isn’t many free museums around. And it’s certainly worth your while, even if you are out of EU is a 1.5€ the entrance (I think ) Go see it
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