Museo Picasso Málaga

Málaga, Spain

The Museo Picasso Málaga is a museum in the city where artist Pablo Ruiz Picasso was born. It opened in 2003 in the Buenavista Palace, and has 285 works donated by members of Picasso's family.

Christine Ruiz-Picasso, widow of the artist's eldest son Paulo Ruiz-Picasso, donated to the museum 14 paintings, 9 sculptures, 44 individual drawings, a sketchbook with a further 36 drawings, 58 engravings, and 7 ceramic pieces, 133 works in all. Her son, Picasso's grandson, Bernard Ruiz-Picasso donated another 5 paintings, 2 drawings, 10 engravings, and 5 ceramics, for an overall total of 155 works. The collection ranges from early academic studies to cubism to his late re-workings of Old Masters. Many additional pieces are on long-term loan to the museum. There is also a library and archive including over 800 titles on Picasso, as well as relevant documents and photographs.

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Founded: 2003
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lenore Ma (2 years ago)
This is one of the top things to do if you visit Malecot, Spain. The museum has a pretty decent collection of Picasso, and provides commentary about the different periods of his life. It also includes a lot of the sketches he did for the larger paintings that you often seen other museums. They include an audio guide when you buy the entrance ticket. The museum is laid out and very well organized way where it is easy to follow the audio guide to get a full explanation of his life. I would allocate around 2 to 3 hours for this.
Hugo Kamps (2 years ago)
A good museum with detailed audio guides to help you along your way through the two sections. You learn a lot about Picasso's life and how the thing happening in the world and in his life affected him and his art style throughout time. The entrance fee was low, especially for students. I can advice this museum to anyone with a small interest in art.
Ingemar Gardell (2 years ago)
You have to really love the specific art and history of Picasso to enjoy this one. If not - then it will be wasted time and money I'm afraid. If you don't know how to interpret these paintings they will not give you anything in forms of feelings, awe or inspiration. This exebition is only for the true hardcore art-lovers.
FlapperGirl Shabbychic (2 years ago)
This is a beautiful museum. A lot of Picasso's work and his notebooks. You can use headphones to hear about each painting and sculptures. We'll worth a visit. Reasonable entry fee too. The gift shop is a bit pricey but there are lots of souvenir shops around so you can get postcards of his work cheaper than the gift shop.
Tiffany Tse (2 years ago)
8 euro for entry and 6 for students (valid student ID + personal ID as you need to be 25 and under to get the price). 2 large rooms, extra price for special exhibit. Free audio guide. No pictures allowed but they don’t tell you until you’re inside and someone stops you from taking a pic. Lots of cool Picasso work but his most famous works are not in here.
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