Málaga Cathedral

Málaga, Spain

The Cathedral of Málaga is in the Renaissance architectural tradition. The cathedral is located within the limits defined by a now missing portion of the medieval Moorish walls, the remains of which surround the nearby Alcazaba and the Castle of Gibralfaro. It was constructed between 1528 and 1782, following the plans drawn by Diego de Siloe in Renaissance style.

The cathedral, built on a rectangular plan, is composed of a nave and two aisles, the former being wider, though having the same height as the aisles. The choir stalls are the work of Pedro de Mena.

The façade, unlike the rest of the building, is in Baroque style and is divided into two levels; on the lower level are three arches, inside of which are portals separated by marble columns. Above the doors are medallions carved in stone; those of the lateral doors represent the patron saints of Málaga, Saint Cyriacus and Saint Paula, while that over the centre represents the Annunciation.

The north tower is 84 metres high, making this building the second-highest cathedral in Andalusia, after the Giralda of Seville. The south tower remains unfinished.

A series of grand artworks fills the sanctuary, among them are the Gothic altarpiece of the Chapel of Santa Barbara and the 16th century tombs of the Chapel of San Francisco. The Chapel of the Incarnation contains a neoclassic altarpiece (1785) designed by the sculptor Juan de Villanueva and carved by Antonio Ramos and Aldehuela, a group of figures representing the Annunciation and sculptures of the patron saints of Malaga, Saint Ciriaco and Saint Paula, carved by Juan Salazar Palomino also in the 18th century, and The Beheading of Saint Paul, painted by Enrique Simonet in 1887 during his stay in Rome.

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Details

Founded: 1528
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Iñigo Jordana (2 years ago)
I've been in Malaga for 2 months and as someone who enjoys praying in Churches, it's been disappointing that the churches here are plenty, but often closed. The beautiful and grand churches here for the aesthetic, mostly, so appreciate them and go inside when you can. Sunday masses usually start at 11-11:30, but there will only be one (sometimes 2) mass per church. The Cathedral is grand and you have to to enter on weekdays. Sundays are free of charge.
Afam Nzulumike (2 years ago)
Amazing! Renaissance style inside and out. The craftsmanship on the interior is very impressive, and so is all the renaissance art work also decorating the interior. The pictures doesn't really do it justice..
Alexandra Stroescu (2 years ago)
Nice little garden. There's a ticket to go in, which I don't like for places of worship. Only admired nice architecture & garden. There's probably a great view of the city from the top, which you also need to pay for (I think it's 6 euro visit/go up the roof, or 10 euro both)
David Lewis (2 years ago)
The inside is impressive - the audio guide is very dry and detailed - great if you are interested in all the iconography but too long for most of us. The rooftop tour is much more interesting. You get fantastic views over the harbour and the city and I think you can just get this tour on its own for €6. The courtyard on the right as you go towards the entrance is a lovely cool & shady spot to relax for a while out of the hot sun.
R K (2 years ago)
I don’t want to spoil too much by sharing the pictures but the real thing is just magnificent and mesmerizing both inside and outside! I fell in love with the architecture and the art pieces that are so important. It’s definitely worth every penny you spend to visit this place as you learn about how it’s build/made. It’s not crowded inside and payment are very easy! Workers were very friendly and the visitors were respectful.
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