Roman Theatre

Málaga, Spain

El Teatro Romano is the oldest survived monument in Málaga City; it is situated at the foot of the famous Alcazaba fortress. The theatre was built in the first century BC, under Emperor Augustus, and was used until the third century AD. Subsequently it was left to ruin for centuries, until the Moors settled in Andalucía. In 756-780AD the amphitheatre was used as a quarry by the Moorish settlers , to excavate the stone used to build the Alcazaba fortress - you can see some Roman columns and capitals in the fortress. Over time it became buried under dirt and rubble, and remained hidden there for almost five centuries.

The theatre was rediscovered in 1951, when the construction of Casa de Cultura uncovered the first archaeological clues. The construction of the gardens was abandoned, and instead excavations began. In 1995 a polemic decision was made to demolish the Casa de la Cultura, which stood over a third of the site. Once the site had been fully excavated, a large scale restoration project began, which proved more difficult than anticipated, as many of the missing pieces are now part of the foundations of the neighbouring Alcazaba.

On 15 September 2011, 27 years after reconstruction began, El Teatro Romano reopened to the public, and held its first stage performances for millenia, with performances from Andrés Mérida, Daniel Casares, and Carlos Álvarez, reading from Juvenal Soto and the poetry of Pablo Picasso and Manuel Alcántara. The amphitheatre is now open throughout the year for visitors, and in summer, it will be used for open-air performances. It seats 220 spectators.

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Founded: 100-0 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Halligan (29 days ago)
Well preserved Roman fort, and later taken over by the Islamic hordes who expanded and made it more habitable for families to live there. Below the walls, are the remains of the Roman amphitheater which sits at the edge of one of Malaga's finest squares, where you can relax and take in the history of the place..
Jo de Boer (36 days ago)
Nice place, in the middle of the centre. Small walk to the viewpoint for great views.
Cheryl Monson (2 months ago)
Small but interesting museum and animated video, liked seeing the real human skeleton. There are replicas of the boulders, too. The theater is a great site to see, especially from the top! Many cute cats wandering around the theater outside too. ?
Georgina Nason (2 months ago)
Ideal location.... So central, lovely views, would highly recommend ?, only minor issue being it would've been handy to have an iron
Isabella Dicaprio (Isabella) (4 months ago)
I cannot stop thinking how much Romans liked coliseums. They are everywhere in Europe and this particular one is very beautiful. It's been well kept, clean and illuminated at night. It really makes the area an authentic time machine. I always go back in time when I visit these kind of sites.
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