Roman Theatre

Málaga, Spain

El Teatro Romano is the oldest survived monument in Málaga City; it is situated at the foot of the famous Alcazaba fortress. The theatre was built in the first century BC, under Emperor Augustus, and was used until the third century AD. Subsequently it was left to ruin for centuries, until the Moors settled in Andalucía. In 756-780AD the amphitheatre was used as a quarry by the Moorish settlers , to excavate the stone used to build the Alcazaba fortress - you can see some Roman columns and capitals in the fortress. Over time it became buried under dirt and rubble, and remained hidden there for almost five centuries.

The theatre was rediscovered in 1951, when the construction of Casa de Cultura uncovered the first archaeological clues. The construction of the gardens was abandoned, and instead excavations began. In 1995 a polemic decision was made to demolish the Casa de la Cultura, which stood over a third of the site. Once the site had been fully excavated, a large scale restoration project began, which proved more difficult than anticipated, as many of the missing pieces are now part of the foundations of the neighbouring Alcazaba.

On 15 September 2011, 27 years after reconstruction began, El Teatro Romano reopened to the public, and held its first stage performances for millenia, with performances from Andrés Mérida, Daniel Casares, and Carlos Álvarez, reading from Juvenal Soto and the poetry of Pablo Picasso and Manuel Alcántara. The amphitheatre is now open throughout the year for visitors, and in summer, it will be used for open-air performances. It seats 220 spectators.

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Details

Founded: 100-0 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katherine Duffus (14 months ago)
For a free little piece of history, I very much enjoyed coming here a lot. It is still in a very good condition and there are information boards as well. When we went, there was a cat sunbathing on the main stage and it was very amusing. It was not too busy as well which meant you could have some breathing space. For families to older couples I would reccomend a visit because I definitely enjoyed coming here for half an hour.
Filippo Milotta (14 months ago)
Nice spot in Malaga, within the city and near a square in which you can listen to casual music and have a drink with your friends
terry flynn (15 months ago)
Stunning spot for a photo and some almonds.There is a great local atmosphere here and plenty of history.The background of the walls reall adds to the mood.Excellent place to hang out in a cafe or take some snaps
john smith (15 months ago)
It’s a pretty, well presented Roman theatre. It’s free and you can get some good pictures. I liked it because it gave me a place to sit and gather my thoughts.
Carol Hutchison (17 months ago)
This is a very interesting place to visit in Málaga. Do not miss the opportunity to walk where the mighty Romans did centuries ago!
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