Estepa Castle

Estepa, Spain

Estepa castle was known in the Islamic period as Hisn Istabba, and was taken by Spanish king Fernando III on 15 August 1241.

The city walls that still surround the old town on the San Cristóbal hill were first built in the tenth century by the Moors, renovated by Almohad invaders in the twelfth, and again reconstructed when Estepa fell to the Christian Order of Santiago in the thirteenth century. The keep inside the walls was built against attacks from Granada in the fourteenth century, and at 26 metres offers sweeping views of the town and surrounding countryside.

A defensive tower built by Lorenzo Suárez de Figueroa, Master of Santiago, it carried out defensive and logistical functions, measuring 26 metres high by 13 metres wide. On clear days, you can see Sierra Nevada from the roof.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.com

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio Leal (2 years ago)
Javier Gonzalez-Soria (3 years ago)
La Alcazaba de Estepa es la antigua alcazaba árabe, localizada en la zona de mayor altitud del municipio. Posteriormente, albergó el palacio de los marqueses de Estepa. De planta casi triangular, se adapta a la topografía del terreno. La muralla de la Alcazaba de Estepa, construida durante el periodo islámico (s. X), fue reconstruida en el siglo XII por los almohades y nuevamente reformada en la época de la Orden de Santiago (s. XIII-XVI). Tras la reconquista, la fortaleza se reserva para la Iglesia de Santa María y para el Palacio de los Marqueses de Estepa, quienes reformarían el antiguo alcázar.
José Luis Medina (3 years ago)
Espectacular, sitio muy bonito con merenderos. Ideal para ir con la familia.
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