Estepa Castle

Estepa, Spain

Estepa castle was known in the Islamic period as Hisn Istabba, and was taken by Spanish king Fernando III on 15 August 1241.

The city walls that still surround the old town on the San Cristóbal hill were first built in the tenth century by the Moors, renovated by Almohad invaders in the twelfth, and again reconstructed when Estepa fell to the Christian Order of Santiago in the thirteenth century. The keep inside the walls was built against attacks from Granada in the fourteenth century, and at 26 metres offers sweeping views of the town and surrounding countryside.

A defensive tower built by Lorenzo Suárez de Figueroa, Master of Santiago, it carried out defensive and logistical functions, measuring 26 metres high by 13 metres wide. On clear days, you can see Sierra Nevada from the roof.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.com

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio Leal (3 years ago)
Javier Gonzalez-Soria (4 years ago)
La Alcazaba de Estepa es la antigua alcazaba árabe, localizada en la zona de mayor altitud del municipio. Posteriormente, albergó el palacio de los marqueses de Estepa. De planta casi triangular, se adapta a la topografía del terreno. La muralla de la Alcazaba de Estepa, construida durante el periodo islámico (s. X), fue reconstruida en el siglo XII por los almohades y nuevamente reformada en la época de la Orden de Santiago (s. XIII-XVI). Tras la reconquista, la fortaleza se reserva para la Iglesia de Santa María y para el Palacio de los Marqueses de Estepa, quienes reformarían el antiguo alcázar.
José Luis Medina (4 years ago)
Espectacular, sitio muy bonito con merenderos. Ideal para ir con la familia.
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Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.