Alcazaba de Antequera

Antequera, Spain

The Alcazaba of Antequera was erected in the 14th century to counter the Christian advance from the north, over Roman ruins.

The fortress is rectangular in shape, with two towers. Its keep (Torre del homenaje, 15th century) is considered amongst the largest of Moorish al-Andalus, with the exception of the Comares Tower of the Alhambra. It is surmounted by a Catholic bell tower/chapel (Templete del Papabellotas) added in 1582.

Connected to the former by a line of walls is the Torre Blanca ('white tower').

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Honza M (2 years ago)
We weren't inside, we just went around the fort. A beautiful monumental fortress above the beautiful city of Antequre. It's definitely worth seeing.
Robert Handley (2 years ago)
Really nice place. €4 each for adults which was well worth as takes a couple of hours to explore the whole place. You can go right up to the top of the bell tower... which is loud when it chimes.
Mike ORiordan (2 years ago)
In a town so full of history, this has to be on your shortlist of places to visit. I recommend visiting the city museum first, then walking up to do the audio tour at the Alcazaba.. the knowledge gained at the city museum will enhance your trip here.
Let's Go Hiking & Camping Outdoor Adventures Meetup (2 years ago)
Really beautiful place - with splendor of Architectiure - Alcazaba is the Heart of Antequera. We have seen couples getting married in the church of Alcazaba. Amazing place to do a photo-shooting session inside and outside with the awasome views to the mountainous landscapes
Chloe Weinheimer (2 years ago)
Beautiful views! Definitely worth the trip. Main structure still intact with lots of details and interesting sights.
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