Antequera Dolmens Site

Antequera, Spain

The Antequera Dolmens Site is a cultural heritage ensemble comprising three prehistorical monuments: the Dolmen of Menga, Dolmen of Viera and Tholos of El Romeral.  It was declared a World Heritage Site in 2016 together with two natural mountain features (the Peña de los Enamorados and El Torcal).

Built during the Neolithic and the Bronze Age out of large stone blocks that form chambers and spaces with lintelled roofs (Menga and Viera) or false cupolas (El Romeral), and used for rituals and funerary purposes, the Antequera megaliths are widely recognised examples of European Megalithism. The megalithic structures are presented in the guise of the natural landscape (buried beneath earth tumuli) and their orientation is based on two natural monuments: La Peña de los Enamorados and El Torcal. These are two indisputable visual landmarks within the property.

The Neolithic Dolmen of Menga represents one of the most important masterpiece of megalithic architecture (Atlantic tradition) based on post-and-lintel construction with an earthen covering, notable for its enormous dimensions that push the size possible in a corridor sepulcher by incorporating the unprecedented solution of intermediate pillars; likewise, the later, Chalcolithic tholos (beehive tomb) of El Romeral complements the two dolmens with its corridor and false dome of drystone masonry (Mediterranean tradition).

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Founded: 3000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

donald gillespie (6 months ago)
A hidden gem on the outskirts of antequerra that is definitely worth the visit. Staff gave a warm welcome and were genuinely pleased to give advice. The history of the discovery in the museum was outstanding. You have to visit and best of all it is free.
Josu Camacho (10 months ago)
Although not strictly speaking a museum, a visit to the Dolmen fe la Menga will be remembered by any visitor to this megalithic monument. This giant funeral hall of over 4000 years is one of the best examples of prehistoric art
Ignacio P. (11 months ago)
Old burying monuments from unknown civilization with more than 4000 years. Very recomendable as it is a unique megalithic funerary settlement in the world with stones that reach 140 Tons. The new museum gives you an overview of the way they were constructed and the beliefs of this culture.
Christopher Eadon (13 months ago)
Fascinating place to visit. The museum is not yet open, but promises to be excellent. The dolmen themselves are awesome but without any information to add context. Look at the YouTube videos
Mic J (2 years ago)
It's not a big sight but the entrance is free and you get info links. Considering how old it is, definitely worth a visit.
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