San Marcos is a Gothic church in Jerez de la Frontera. It originates from one of the six parishes founded by King Alfonso X of Castile after his conquest of the city in 1264. The current edifice was likely started in the mid-14th century, due to the style of its polygonal apse and the Mudéjar portal, perhaps above a pre-existing mosque. The construction is anyway not documented until the middle of the 15th century, including a substantial renovation in late Gothic style.

The church has three façades, with a main entrance portal in Mannerist style (16th century). The interior has a Baroque high altar (18th century)

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Benito Gutierrez (12 months ago)
Es una iglesia que te sorprenderá gratamente, tiene una estructura muy interesante y entramos sin ninguna pretensión. Las naves, los cuadros y los santos son muy interesantes. No tiene nada que envidiar la a la Catedral salvando las diferencias.
Maria Jesús Pérez Navarro (12 months ago)
Tiene un maravilloso órgano en perfecto funcionamiento. Todos los días a las 13.30 horas hay Misa.
Cristina Lizarbe Nuin (14 months ago)
Impresionante su retablo , el paso de Cristo descolgando por sus psisanos . De un realismo y unas dimensiones brutales.
Luis M.Monteoliva (15 months ago)
Un buen ejemplo de signo e instrumento de la unión íntima de Dios con el hombre,para la unidad de todo el género humano. De las primeras iglesias que se fundan en Jerez en el siglo XIII y catalogada como Bien de Interés Cultural.
Ricardo García López (2 years ago)
Very beautiful place with gorgeous liturgy on Sundays at 7 pm.
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