San Marcos is a Gothic church in Jerez de la Frontera. It originates from one of the six parishes founded by King Alfonso X of Castile after his conquest of the city in 1264. The current edifice was likely started in the mid-14th century, due to the style of its polygonal apse and the Mudéjar portal, perhaps above a pre-existing mosque. The construction is anyway not documented until the middle of the 15th century, including a substantial renovation in late Gothic style.

The church has three façades, with a main entrance portal in Mannerist style (16th century). The interior has a Baroque high altar (18th century)

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Samuel Scimeca (2 years ago)
Beautiful small church in center of jerez.
ROVIEDO ROVI (2 years ago)
Beautiful church
Loli Romera Santafosta (2 years ago)
Very good silent access where being able to collect yourself is great
Nelson Cea (2 years ago)
Wonderful, it should have a longer opening hours so that everyone who passes by can enter to see it. Obligatory point of visit.
Benito Gutierrez (3 years ago)
Es una iglesia que te sorprenderá gratamente, tiene una estructura muy interesante y entramos sin ninguna pretensión. Las naves, los cuadros y los santos son muy interesantes. No tiene nada que envidiar la a la Catedral salvando las diferencias.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.