The Church of San Dionisio was built in the late 15th century in Gothic-Mudéjar style, although its interior was later renovated in Baroque style (18th century) by architects Diego Antonio Díaz and Pedro de Silva.

The parish was established by Alfonso X the Wise in the name of Saint Denis as the city was returned to Christian rule on Saint Denis's Day in 1264.

The church has a basilica plan, divided into three naves by tall and simple pillars adorned with Almohad decorations. The arcades (aside from those near the high altar) are ogival. The naves end with apses with Baroque altars, including the high altar which dates to the pre-Baroque renovation.

The side chapels are in Baroque style. The chapel of the Christ of the Water includes an image of Jesus from the 15th century. The tower known as Torre de la Atalaya was also built in the fifteenth century. Although this is attached to the church it was a civilian construction intended to serve as a watchtower for both fires and attack and to hold the town's clock. The tower has been separately listed from the church as being of cultural interest. The tower was first mentioned in 1447 and the clock was installed in 1454 and the tower was first used as a watchtower in 1484.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Ignacio Rivas Zaballos (2 years ago)
Preciosa iglesia de Jerez dedicada al patrón de la ciudad. La Torre de la Atalaya, aunque esta adosada a la iglesia, es una torre civil de vigilancia (si bien al unirse también le sirve de campanario). El retablo principal es muy bonito. Muy buena iniciativa la de adaptar la cripta de la iglesia como un columbario.
christian faloppa (2 years ago)
Beautiful basic church
Pete Mitchel (2 years ago)
If you visiting Andalucia, find a time to visit this parish.
alex dima (4 years ago)
Very nice square.
José Antonio Tizón Caro (5 years ago)
nice a cosy
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