The Church of San Dionisio was built in the late 15th century in Gothic-Mudéjar style, although its interior was later renovated in Baroque style (18th century) by architects Diego Antonio Díaz and Pedro de Silva.

The parish was established by Alfonso X the Wise in the name of Saint Denis as the city was returned to Christian rule on Saint Denis's Day in 1264.

The church has a basilica plan, divided into three naves by tall and simple pillars adorned with Almohad decorations. The arcades (aside from those near the high altar) are ogival. The naves end with apses with Baroque altars, including the high altar which dates to the pre-Baroque renovation.

The side chapels are in Baroque style. The chapel of the Christ of the Water includes an image of Jesus from the 15th century. The tower known as Torre de la Atalaya was also built in the fifteenth century. Although this is attached to the church it was a civilian construction intended to serve as a watchtower for both fires and attack and to hold the town's clock. The tower has been separately listed from the church as being of cultural interest. The tower was first mentioned in 1447 and the clock was installed in 1454 and the tower was first used as a watchtower in 1484.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ignacio Rivas Zaballos (14 months ago)
Preciosa iglesia de Jerez dedicada al patrón de la ciudad. La Torre de la Atalaya, aunque esta adosada a la iglesia, es una torre civil de vigilancia (si bien al unirse también le sirve de campanario). El retablo principal es muy bonito. Muy buena iniciativa la de adaptar la cripta de la iglesia como un columbario.
christian faloppa (18 months ago)
Beautiful basic church
Pete Mitchel (19 months ago)
If you visiting Andalucia, find a time to visit this parish.
alex dima (3 years ago)
Very nice square.
José Antonio Tizón Caro (4 years ago)
nice a cosy
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.