Matrera Castle was built in the 9th century by Omar ibn Hafsún to defend Iptuci, the most advanced city of the Cora de Ronda. However, Mount Pajarete was a place of human settlement since Antiquity.

In the 13th century, it was conquered by San Fernando, who rebuilt it. Nevertheless, at the beginning of the XIV century, it returned to Muslim hands, being definitively reconquered by Alfonso XI in 1341. However, being located in the middle of the Moorish Border or Band was besieged by the Muslims of Granada in 1408 and in 1445.

By 2010, only a few walls of the castle remained standing, and the ruins were further damaged by rain in 2013. A restoration project was launched in 2010 and completed in 2015. Parts of the tower were rebuilt with lime plaster similar to samples found on the site, with large, plain blocks defining the original shape of the castle.

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Villamartín, Spain
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Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

CARLOS JAVIER NATERA GARCIA (16 months ago)
Lo poco que queda del castillo...
ANA BELÉN (17 months ago)
Como paseo muy bien, las vistas estupendas el castillo en si, es una torre.
Luis Culla (2 years ago)
Bonito paseo hasta los restos del restaurado castillo
Petr Šandl (2 years ago)
worth seeing, non touristic
F.M.N. Mary Flo (2 years ago)
Sin palabras. El recorrido es fácil. Debo destacar que aún no han retirado los escombros desde la desarmada rehabilitación ( No soy yo la única que piensa asi ). Debería haberse conservado cuando aún tenían techos las 2 plantas, baja y alta. Fue premio pero quedo muy artificial. El lugar y las vistas alucinantes
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