Zahara de los Atunes Castle

Zahara de los Atunes, Spain

The Castle of Zahara de los Atunes and Palace of Jadraza is a medieval castle on Spain's coast. In 1294, King Sancho IV of Castile granted a licence to Don Alonso Pérez de Guzmán to build traps for tuna fishing in reward for his heroic defense of Tarifa. Guzman fisheries in Zahara de los Atunes and Conil de la Frontera were for centuries the most productive in Europe provoking the development of important auxiliary buildings.

The Palace served three functions: as a fortified castle to protect against Barbary pirates, a residential palace during the Tuna Season and a processing plant to deal with the tuna. Its location at a strategic point of the Strait of Gibraltar has been given prominence in numerous historical events, and it maintains a continued presence in coastal mapping. In the twentieth century the building was used by the fishing industry before becoming a barracks.

Building is a square structure defined by four defensive walls with parapet surmounted with a narrow walkway. In the north-west corner is the so-called Torre de Poniente which has an inner chamber beneath a high domed roof also with a parapet. In the north-east are the remains of de la Torre de Levante. Both towers were designed as corbelled spaces to overlook the defensive curtain walls.

The main gateway is located in the west wall, the two sea gates are in the south, which originally also provided access to large patio inner enclosure of the building. In the twentieth century 'New Gate' was added in the north wall, where there are also various other piercings introduced for practical reasons as the use of the building developed over time.

The factory is made of regular masonry blocks with lime grout and pebbles. The corners boast reinforced stonework. The three original stone doors were of generous proportions with arches and keystones . At the sea gates, two separate buttresses of considerable thickness are arranged inward to reinforce them in their defensive mission.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomás Marín Parreňo (6 months ago)
Great treatment, ecpectacular location, everything very clean and tidy ... To repeat.
Juaking Cabrera (6 months ago)
Very clean rooms, perfect location, you go down the street and you have the beach, very friendly treatment by the receptionist and what I liked the most is being able to bring my pet and without any additional cost or size limitations, without a doubt if I return for the area I will repeat
Fco. Javier Martínez Medina (7 months ago)
Perfect location, very clean, cheap and good service. The only but is that most of the rooms do not have a small refrigerator or refrigerator so that you can have a fresh drink during your stay or be able to freeze plates for the refrigerator that you take to the beach. Otherwise, perfect.
Clara Martín Díaz (8 months ago)
I can only talk about the cafeteria. Good varied breakfasts and excellent coffee. It is my daily place for many years, the owners are excellent people and the waiters are very nice and attentive (good service in general). Highly recommended.
Luciano Cantarini (2 years ago)
Hay que tener en cuenta que al estar en el centro hay ruido y de madrugada te pueden despertar las personas que practican el canto de ópera borrachil junto con los que hablan para los sordos. La ducha era pequeña. El personal fué amable.
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