Santa Maria del Carmine Church

Pavia, Italy

Santa Maria del Carmine is considered amongst the best examples of Lombard Gothic architecture. It was begun in 1374 by Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan, on a project attributed to Bernardo da Venezia. The construction followed a slow pace, and was restarted in 1432, being finished in 1461.

Exterior

The church has an imposing façade commanding the square with the same name; the slender forms betray a residual Romanesque influence, although the decorations are undoubutably of Lombard Gothic style. The façade is divided into five vertical compartments by six pilasters surmounted by spires. The three central sectors have a portal each, remade by Giuseppe Marchesi in 1854. Over the portals are four large ogival mullioned windows and an elaborated rose window in brickwork.

The bell tower, dating to c. 1450, has numerous friezes and a triple mullioned window with marble columns.

Interior

The interior is characterized by an inspiring penumbra, and is on the Latin cross plan with a nave and numerous lateral chapels with frescoes and paintings.

In the transept are also precious 15th-century frescoes, while the sacristy (1576) has façade with Baroque stuccoes. Also notable is the Gothic tabernacle (1449) and the marble altar of the presbytery.

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Address

Via del Carmine 11, Pavia, Italy
See all sites in Pavia

Details

Founded: 1374-1461
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adam Granicz (3 years ago)
Stunning church, well worth a visit!
nic // (3 years ago)
its so lovely and artistic
Daksiya Velautham (3 years ago)
Amazing ancient architecture. Treat to civil engineers eyes
Davide Di Martino (3 years ago)
This church still preserve the charm of sacred spaces. True haven of tranquillity if you are looking for a place of quiet and meditation. Relevant works of art and frescoes enrich the different chapels and the main altar.
Brian Thome (4 years ago)
My favorite Church in Pavia. On a very quiet piazza. Beautiful Lombard Gothic facade that seems to light up in the late afternoon sun. Definitely the highlight. Inside has some mildly interesting chapels and monuments. A nice Sebastiano Ricci altarpiece. In and out in 20 minutes. Free.
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