Santi Primo e Feliciano Church

Pavia, Italy

Santi Primo e Feliciano church at the site is documented since the 12th century. It belonged to a college of canons regular who in 1354, became members of the Congregation of Servants of Mary, and so remained till the 18th century. The convent was suppressed in 1810.

The original structure had three naves, but in the 15th century an additional nave was added. In the 16th century, the church was reduced to a single nave, with demolition of the prior apse. The facade was restored in 1940.

The first chapel on the right has a Virgin and child with Blessed Bertoni and St John the Baptist (1498) by Agostino da Vaprio. The superior lunette has a fresco depicting God the Father. The transept has a large canvas depicting the Martyrdom of St Lawrence by Marcantonio Pellini (1664-1760). The presbytery has two lateral frescoes depicting the Life of Saints Primo and Feliciano (1860) by Bardotti. They depict The Trial of the Saints on the left, and Martyrdom of the Saints, on the right. The first chapel on the left has a Crucifixion with St Pellegrino by Sabbadini.

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Address

Via Langosco 8, Pavia, Italy
See all sites in Pavia

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aurelia Priolo (12 months ago)
Un piccolo gioiello da visitare
Virgilio Furiosi (12 months ago)
Una delle chiese romaniche di Pavia.
Giorgio Isola (12 months ago)
Uno dei tanti tesori semisconosciuti della nostra antica città!
suvedha kaneti (13 months ago)
I find it so peaceful and the people are so helpful
Marisa Brera (17 months ago)
Piccolo gioiello romanico nel cuore di Pavia chiesa di antiche tradizioni con interessanti altari laterali poco conisciuta da chi non è pavese merita sicuramente una visita se si trova il parroco gli si chieda di poter visitare una navata normalmente chiusa dove si possono ammirare antichi affreschi abbastanza bene conservati
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