Pavia Botanical Garden

Pavia, Italy

The Orto Botanico dell'Università di Pavia is a botanical garden maintained by the University of Pavia.

The garden was begun in 1773 as a successor to Pavia's earlier Orto dei Semplici (established 1558). By 1775 the garden was in use, with its first wooden greenhouses constructed in 1776. Nocca Domenico organized and expanded the garden 1797–1826, adding collections to exchange seeds and plants, and building a masonry greenhouse to replace the earlier wooden structures. The garden was extensively damaged in World War II, after which its greenhouses were relocated to the main building's south side.

Today the garden contains about 2000 taxa, with major collections of aquatic plants, conifers, hosta, hydrangea, magnolia, medical plants, peat bog plants, and a rose garden.

References:

    Comments

    Your name



    Details

    Founded: 1773
    Category:

    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Silvia Edimono (6 months ago)
    Excellent vegetable garden, however, there are no fundamental cultures that have now established themselves in our society ... you can find those that are now only dry, a living example would be essential for the culture of Pavia university students
    Giusto Lo Bue (2 years ago)
    Bello!!
    Giusto Lo Bue (2 years ago)
    Bello!!
    Rebecca De Pasquale (2 years ago)
    Ci sono andata come open day universitario. Il giardiniere e custode(di cui non ricordo il nome,sorry) che ha guidato la visita gentilissimo,preparato e davvero appassionato come pochi. Purtroppo,a causa della mancanza di fondi,molto zone sono un po' messe male,ma sicuramente non è colpa dei giardinieri. Vale sicuramente la pena andarci ma verso aprile/maggio.
    francisco sanchez (2 years ago)
    I have classes over here so is kinda nice
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Kisimul Castle

    Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

    Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

    The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.