Pavia Botanical Garden

Pavia, Italy

The Orto Botanico dell'Università di Pavia is a botanical garden maintained by the University of Pavia.

The garden was begun in 1773 as a successor to Pavia's earlier Orto dei Semplici (established 1558). By 1775 the garden was in use, with its first wooden greenhouses constructed in 1776. Nocca Domenico organized and expanded the garden 1797–1826, adding collections to exchange seeds and plants, and building a masonry greenhouse to replace the earlier wooden structures. The garden was extensively damaged in World War II, after which its greenhouses were relocated to the main building's south side.

Today the garden contains about 2000 taxa, with major collections of aquatic plants, conifers, hosta, hydrangea, magnolia, medical plants, peat bog plants, and a rose garden.

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    Founded: 1773
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    en.wikipedia.org

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    User Reviews

    Giusto Lo Bue (9 months ago)
    Bello!!
    Rebecca De Pasquale (9 months ago)
    Ci sono andata come open day universitario. Il giardiniere e custode(di cui non ricordo il nome,sorry) che ha guidato la visita gentilissimo,preparato e davvero appassionato come pochi. Purtroppo,a causa della mancanza di fondi,molto zone sono un po' messe male,ma sicuramente non è colpa dei giardinieri. Vale sicuramente la pena andarci ma verso aprile/maggio.
    francisco sanchez (16 months ago)
    I have classes over here so is kinda nice
    Shubham Saini (3 years ago)
    Its free entry. If you are boaring explore this place ;)
    gigi stercofolti (4 years ago)
    Not big or particulary intresting but a nice place to have a walk in.
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